prescription

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Middle French, from Old French prescripcion, from Latin praescriptio (preface; pretext; something written ahead of time), from prae- (pre-, before) + scribere (to write) +‎ -tio (-tion, forming nouns).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /pɹəˈskɹɪpʃən/, (proscribed) /pɝˈskɹɪpʃən/
  • (file)

NounEdit

prescription (countable and uncountable, plural prescriptions)

  1. (medicine, pharmacy, pharmacology) A written order from an authorized medical practitioner for provision of a medicine or other treatment, such as (ophthalmology) the specific lenses needed for a pair of glasses.
    Synonyms: scrip, forescript, Rx,
    The surgeon had written thousands of prescriptions for pain killers without proper examinations before the police raided the clinic.
  2. (medicine) The medicine or treatment provided by such an order.
    • 1842, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Lady Anne Granard, volume 1, page 9:
      "Oh, yes; she is the only sort of person for a nurse. She always," cried Lady Anne, with a sneer, "comes to you with a receipt for a pudding in one hand to make you ill, and then a prescription in the other to cure you."
    I need you to pick up gramma's prescriptions on your way home.
  3. (figuratively) Any plan of treatment or planned treatment.
    • 1837, Letitia Elizabeth Landon, Ethel Churchill, volume 3, page 145:
      Change is the universal prescription for a wounded spirit. "It will do you so much good," is the constant remark.
    • 1964, Ernest Hemingway, A Moveable Feast, p. 157:
      ...looking at him I saw that I had been wrong in my prescription, if not in my diagnosis, and that the whisky was working against us.
    Early to bed and early to rise is a prescription for a long, healthy, and terrible life.
  4. (law) Synonym of enactment, the act of establishing a law, regulation, &c. particularly in writing; an instance of this.
  5. (linguistics) The act of establishing or formalizing ideal norms for language use, as opposed to describing the actual norms of such use; an instance of this.
  6. (law) An established time period within which a right must be exercised and after which it is null and permanently unenforceable.
    Synonyms: extinctive prescription, liberative prescription
  7. (law) An established time period after which a person who has uninterruptedly, peacefully, and publicly used another's property acquires full ownership of it.
    Synonyms: acquisitive prescription, usucaption
  8. (obsolete) Synonym of self-restraint, limiting of one's actions especially according to a moral code or social conventions.
    • 1853, Charles Dickens, Bleak House, Ch. 2:
      There is an air of prescription about him which is always agreeable to Sir Leicester; he receives it as a kind of tribute.

Usage notesEdit

Often misspelled as or confused with proscription, the act of prohibiting something or condemning someone.

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AdjectiveEdit

prescription (not comparable)

  1. (of a drug, etc.) only available with a physician or nurse practitioner's written prescription
    Many powerful pain killers are prescription drugs in the U.S.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French prescripcion, borrowed from Latin praescriptio, praescriptionem.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

prescription f (plural prescriptions)

  1. prescription (all senses)

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French prescripcion, borrowed from Latin praescriptio, praescriptionem.

NounEdit

prescription f (plural prescriptions)

  1. (Jersey) prescription