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See also: Providence

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Anglo-Norman providence, Middle French providence, and their source, Latin prōvidentia (providence, foresight), from the present participle of prōvidēre (to provide).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

providence (countable and uncountable, plural providences)

  1. (now rare) Preparation for the future; good governance, foresight. [from 14th c.]
  2. The careful governance and guidance of god (or another deity, nature etc.). [from 14th c.]
  3. A manifestation of divine care or direction; an instance of divine intervention. [from 16th c.]
    • 1971, Keith Thomas, Religion and the Decline of Magic, Folio Society 2012, p. 91:
      The idea was that a complete list of fully documented providences should be compiled as a cooperative venture which would cross denominational barriers.
  4. Specifically, the prudent care and management of resources; thriftiness, frugality. [from 17th c.]
    His providence in saving for his old age is exemplary.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

providence f (plural providences)

  1. providence

Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

providence f (nominative singular providence)

  1. providence (manifestation of divine care or direction)