See also: Nature

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English nature, natur, borrowed from Old French nature, from Latin nātūra (birth, origin, natural constitution or quality), future participle from perfect passive participle (g)natus (born), from deponent verb (g)nasci (to be born, originate) + future participle suffix -urus. Displaced native Middle English cunde, icunde (nature, property, type, genus, character) (from Old English ġecynd), Middle English lund (nature, disposition) (from Old Norse lund), Middle English burthe (nature, birth, nation) (from Old English ġebyrd and Old Norse *byrðr). More at kind.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nature (countable and uncountable, plural natures)

  1. (uncountable) The natural world; that which consists of all things unaffected by or predating human technology, production, and design. (Compare ecosystem.)
    Nature never lies (i.e. tells untruths).
    Tectonic activity is part of nature, so there's no way to stop earthquakes.
  2. The innate characteristics of a thing. What something will tend by its own constitution, to be or do. Distinct from what might be expected or intended.
    • 1920, Herman Cyril McNeile, Bulldog Drummond, Ch.1:
      Being by nature of a cheerful disposition, the symptom did not surprise his servant, late private of the same famous regiment, who was laying breakfast in an adjoining room.
    • 1869, Horatio Alger, Jr., Mark the Match Boy, chapter 16:
      Mark hardly knew whether to believe this or not. He already began to suspect that Roswell was something of a humbug, and though it was not in his nature to form a causeless dislike, he certainly did not feel disposed to like Roswell.
  3. The summary of everything that has to do with biological, chemical and physical states and events in the physical universe.
  4. Conformity to that which is natural, as distinguished from that which is artificial, or forced, or remote from actual experience.
  5. Kind, sort; character; quality.
    It's not in my nature to steal.
  6. (obsolete) Physical constitution or existence; the vital powers; the natural life.
  7. (obsolete) Natural affection or reverence.
    • 1703, Alexander Pope, transl., “The Thebais of Statius”, in The Works of Alexander Pope, London: H. Lintont et al., published 1751:
      Have we not seen
      The murdering son ascend his parent's bed,
      Through violated nature force his way?

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Pages starting with “nature”.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

nature (third-person singular simple present natures, present participle naturing, simple past and past participle natured)

  1. (obsolete) To endow with natural qualities.

ReferencesEdit

  • nature at OneLook Dictionary Search
  • nature in Keywords for Today: A 21st Century Vocabulary, edited by The Keywords Project, Colin MacCabe, Holly Yanacek, 2018.
  • "nature" in Raymond Williams, Keywords (revised), 1983, Fontana Press, page 219.
  • nature in The Century Dictionary, New York, N.Y.: The Century Co., 1911.
  • nature in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

nature

  1. naturally

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French nature, borrowed from Latin nātūra.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nature f (plural natures)

  1. nature
  2. (grammar) lexical category

Derived termsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

 
une brioche nature

nature (plural natures)

  1. plain, unseasoned
    Une brioche nature ou sucrée ?
    File-moi un yaourt nature s’il te plait.
  2. bareback, raw dog
    Une fellation nature.

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

nature f

  1. plural of natura

AdjectiveEdit

nature (invariable)

  1. natural

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

nātūre

  1. vocative masculine singular of nātūrus

Middle DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French nature, from Latin nātūra.

NounEdit

nature f

  1. nature, force of nature
  2. laws of nature, natural order
  3. nature, innate characteristics
  4. kind, sort
  5. origin
  6. sexual fertility, sex drive

InflectionEdit

This noun needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

  • Dutch: natuur
  • Limburgish: netuur, netuuer

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French nature, from Latin nātūra.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nature (plural natures)

  1. The Universe, existence, creation
  2. nature, the natural world
  3. natural abilities
  4. natural inevitability, nature (as opposed to nurture)
  5. natural morals, natural law
  6. natural needs or requirements
  7. nature, state, condition
  8. species, kind, type
  9. Nature (allegory)

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French nature, borrowed from Latin nātūra.

NounEdit

nature f (plural natures)

  1. nature

DescendantsEdit


NovialEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin nātūra.

NounEdit

nature (plural natures)

  1. nature

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin nātūra.

NounEdit

nature f (oblique plural natures, nominative singular nature, nominative plural natures)

  1. nature (natural world; nonhuman world)
    • circa 1170, Chrétien de Troyes, 'Érec et Énide':
      De cesti tesmoingne Nature,
      Qu'onques si bele creature
      Ne fu veüe an tot le monde.
      Nature can testify
      That never such a beautiful creature
      Was seen in the whole world
  2. nature (character; qualities)

DescendantsEdit