See also: Front, Front., and frōnt

English

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Etymology

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English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

From Middle English front, frunt, frount, from Old French front, frunt, from Latin frōns, frontem (forehead). Doublet of frons.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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front (countable and uncountable, plural fronts)

  1. The foremost side of something or the end that faces the direction it normally moves.
  2. The side of a building with the main entrance.
    • 1913, Joseph C[rosby] Lincoln, chapter I, in Mr. Pratt’s Patients, New York, N.Y., London: D[aniel] Appleton and Company, →OCLC:
      Pretty soon I struck into a sort of path []. It twisted and turned, [] and opened out into a big clear space like a lawn. And, back of the lawn, was a big, old-fashioned house, with piazzas stretching in front of it, and all blazing with lights.
  3. A field of activity.
    • 2012 January, Stephen Ledoux, “Behaviorism at 100”, in American Scientist, volume 100, number 1, page 60:
      Becoming more aware of the progress that scientists have made on behavioral fronts can reduce the risk that other natural scientists will resort to mystical agential accounts when they exceed the limits of their own disciplinary training.
  4. A person or institution acting as the public face of some other, covert group.
    Officially it's a dry-cleaning shop, but everyone knows it's a front for the mafia.
  5. (meteorology) The interface or transition zone between two airmasses of different density, often resulting in precipitation. Since the temperature distribution is the most important regulator of atmospheric density, a front almost invariably separates airmasses of different temperature.
    We need to take the clothes off the line. The news reported a front is coming in from the east, and we can expect heavy rain and maybe hail.
  6. (military) An area where armies are engaged in conflict, especially the line of contact.
  7. (military) The lateral space occupied by an element measured from the extremity of one flank to the extremity of the other flank.
  8. (military) The direction of the enemy.
  9. (military) When a combat situation does not exist or is not assumed, the direction toward which the command is faced.
  10. (historical) A major military subdivision of the Soviet Army.
  11. (dated) Cheek; boldness; impudence.
  12. (informal) An act, show, façade, persona: an intentional and false impression of oneself.
    He says he likes hip-hop, but I think it's just a front.
    You don't need to put on a front. Just be yourself.
  13. (historical) That which covers the foremost part of the head: a front piece of false hair worn by women.
    • 1856, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, “(please specify either |book=1 to 9 or the page)”, in Aurora Leigh, London: Chapman and Hall, [], published 1857, →OCLC:
      like any plain Miss Smith's, who wears a front
  14. The most conspicuous part.
  15. The beginning.
  16. (UK) A seafront or coastal promenade.
  17. (obsolete) The forehead or brow, the part of the face above the eyes; sometimes, also, the whole face.
  18. (slang, hotels, dated) The bellhop whose turn it is to answer a client's call, which is often the word "front" used as an exclamation.
  19. (slang, in the plural) A grill (jewellery worn on front teeth).

Synonyms

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Antonyms

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Hyponyms

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  • (The foremost side of something or the end that faces the direction it normally moves): (nautical) bow (of a ship)

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Tok Pisin: fran
  • Japanese: フロント (furonto)
  • Korean: 프런트 (peureonteu)

Translations

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The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Adjective

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front (comparative further front, superlative furthest front)

  1. Located at or near the front.
    The front runner was thirty meters ahead of her nearest competitor.
  2. (comparable, phonetics) Pronounced with the highest part of the body of the tongue toward the front of the mouth, near the hard palate (most often describing a vowel).
    The English word dress has a front vowel in most dialects.
  3. Closest or nearest, of a set of futures contracts which expire at particular times, or of the times they expire; (typically, the front month or front year is the next calendar month or year after the current one).
    Synonym: prompt
    Antonym: back
    • 1995, Ignacio Mas, Jesús Saá-Requejo, Using Financial Futures in Trading and Risk Management, World Bank Publications, page 11:
      Contracts are available for every month in the front year but do not extend over a year.
    • 2000, The Handbook of World Stock, Derivative & Commodity Exchanges:
      Contract months : March, June, September and December[.] Minimum price fluctuation : 0.005 Index Point (1/2 basis point) equivalent to USD 12.50 per tick for the front-year Eurodollar futures []
    • 2003, Larry Harris, Trading and Exchanges: Market Microstructure for Practitioners, OUP USA, →ISBN, page 54:
      The contract that will expire next is called the front contract or front month contract. The other contracts are called the back contracts. In financial and industrial commodities, traders mostly trade only the front month contract.
    • 2010 December 30, Frank J. Fabozzi, Anand K. Bhattacharya, William S. Berliner, Mortgage-Backed Securities: Products, Structuring, and Analytical Techniques, John Wiley & Sons, →ISBN, page 35:
      Buying the security for the earlier (or “front”) month, and owning (and financing) it for the period ending with the latter (or “back” month) settlement date.
    • 2016 August 8, Steve Bell, Quantitative Finance For Dummies, John Wiley & Sons, →ISBN, page 113:
      To a speculator, a front month future is attractive. Refer to Figure 6-1 to see that both the open interest and the trading volume of the front-month contract exceeds that of all the other contracts.
    • 2017 October 17, Emmanuel Jurczenko, Factor Investing: From Traditional to Alternative Risk Premia, Elsevier, →ISBN, page 359:
      An alternative definition would estimate the slope using the front futures contract and the contract expiring 1 year after (these contracts are relatively liquid in the commodity markets).
    • 2021 March 22, Alexander During, Fixed Income Trading and Risk Management: The Complete Guide, John Wiley & Sons, →ISBN, page 324:
      When the back contract has a higher PVBP than the front contract, fewer back contracts need to be bought or sold than front contracts are sold or bought. The PVBP-neutral roll ratio is simply the ratio of the front and back contracts []
    • 2021 June 3, Mogens Steffensen, Risks: Feature Papers 2020, MDPI, →ISBN, page 109:
      This means that in absolute terms, the number of transactions that is triggered by external sources is highest for the front contract of corn.
    • 2021 September 28, Todd E. Petzel, Modern Portfolio Management: Moving Beyond Modern Portfolio Theory, John Wiley & Sons, →ISBN, page 471:
      Going long the front futures contract and holding it a month in the example now produces a loss of $1 per barrel as the futures market converges to spot. And as long as the market is in a carry, this loss will happen continuously over []

Synonyms

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Antonyms

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  • (antonym(s) of located near the front): back, last, rear
  • (antonym(s) of phonetics): back

Translations

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Verb

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front (third-person singular simple present fronts, present participle fronting, simple past and past participle fronted)

  1. (intransitive, dated) To face (on, to); to be pointed in a given direction.
    • 1726 October 28, [Jonathan Swift], Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World. [] [Gulliver’s Travels], volume I, London: [] Benj[amin] Motte, [], →OCLC, part I (A Voyage to Lilliput):
      The great gate fronting to the north was about four feet high, and almost two feet wide, through which I could easily creep.
    • 1939, Raymond Chandler, The Big Sleep, Penguin, published 2011, page 35:
      The door fronted on a narrow run, like a footbridge over a gully, that filled the gap between the house wall and the edge of the bank.
    • 1999, George R.R. Martin, A Clash of Kings, Bantam, published 2011, page 312:
      They emerged atop the broad curving steps that fronted on the Street of the Sisters, near the foot of Visenya's Hill.
    • 2010, Ingrid D Rowland, "The Siege of Rome", New York Review of Books, Blog, 26 March:
      The palazzo has always fronted on a bus stop—but this putative man of the people has kindly put an end to that public service.
  2. (transitive) To face, be opposite to.
    • 1749, [John Cleland], “(Please specify the letter or volume)”, in Memoirs of a Woman of Pleasure [Fanny Hill], London: [] G. Fenton [i.e., Fenton and Ralph Griffiths] [], →OCLC:
      After saluting her, he led her to a couch that fronted us, where they both sat down, and the young Genoese helped her to a glass of wine, with some Naples biscuit on a salver.
    • 1813 January 27, [Jane Austen], Pride and Prejudice: [], volumes (please specify |volume=I to III), London: [] [George Sidney] for T[homas] Egerton, [], →OCLC:
      [] down they ran into the dining-room, which fronted the lane, in quest of this wonder; it was two ladies stopping in a low phaeton at the garden gate.
    • 1913, D[avid] H[erbert] Lawrence, Sons and Lovers, London: Duckworth & Co. [], →OCLC:
      She sat on a seat under the alders in the cricket ground, and fronted the evening.
  3. (transitive) To face up to, to meet head-on, to confront.
  4. (transitive) To adorn with, at the front; to put on the front.
    • 2001, Terry Goodkind, The Pillars of Creation, page 148:
      Three tiers of balconies fronted with roped columns supporting arched openings looked down on the marble hall.
  5. (phonetics, transitive, intransitive) To pronounce with the tongue in a front position.
    • 2005, Paul Skandera, Peter Burleigh, A Manual of English Phonetics and Phonology, page 48:
      The velar plosives are often fronted through the influence of a following front vowel, and retracted through the influence of a following back vowel.
  6. (linguistics, transitive) To move (a word or clause) to the start of a sentence (or series of adjectives, etc).
    • 2001, Arthur J. Holmer, Jan-Olof Svantesson, Åke Viberg, Proceedings of the 18th Scandinavian Conference of Linguistics:
      [] in the clause, only the adjective may be fronted; but if both a past participle and a verbal particle are present, either may be fronted. Topicalization, in which maximal projections are fronted to express pragmatics such as contrast, emphasis, ...
    • 2010, George Melville Bolling, Bernard Bloch, Language:
      A problem facing any syntactic analysis of hyperbaton is that nonconstituent strings are fronted [] In cases where the adjective is fronted with the determiner, the determiner is not doubled []
  7. (intransitive, slang) To act as a front (for); to cover (for).
    • 2007, Harold Robbins, A Stone for Danny Fisher, page 183:
      Everybody knew Skopas fronted for the fight mob even though he was officially the arena manager.
  8. (transitive) To lead or be the spokesperson of (a campaign, organisation etc.).
    • 2009 September 1, Mark Sweney, The Guardian:
      Ray Winstone is fronting a campaign for the Football Association that aims to stop pushy parents shouting abuse at their children during the grassroots football season.
  9. (transitive, intransitive) Of an alter in dissociative identity disorder: to be the currently actively presenting member of (a system), in control of the patient's body.
    • 2018, Eric Yarbrough, Transgender Mental Health, page 160:
      Fronting can be understood as a representation of who controls the system, that is, the person to whom you are speaking. Emilia was typically the person fronting her system.
  10. (transitive, colloquial) To provide money or financial assistance in advance to.
    • 2004, Danielle Steele, Ransom, page 104:
      I'm prepared to say that I fronted you the money for a business deal with me, and the investment paid off brilliantly.
  11. (intransitive, slang) To assume false or disingenuous appearances.
    Synonyms: put on airs, feign
    • 1993 November 19, Bobby Hill, “Mad Real”, in Washington City Paper[3], archived from the original on 5 February 2013:
      So when I tell people where I'm from and check their reactions, I know in my heart I'm just frontin’. Because the way and where I lived then pales when compared to the way and where many youths are living today.
    • 1994, Rivers Cuomo (lyrics and music), “Buddy Holly”, performed by Weezer:
      What's with these homies dissin' my girl? / Why do they gotta front?
    • 2006, Noire [pseudonym], Thug-A-Licious: An Urban Erotic Tale, New York, N.Y.: One World, Ballantine Books, →ISBN, page 101:
      No matter how hard she fronted in the coming years, Carmiesha could never forget that she had given birth and had a child in this world. Even when she tried not to remember, she still couldn’t forget.
    • 2008, Briscoe/Akinyemi, ‘Womanizer’:
      Boy don't try to front, / I-I know just-just what you are, are-are.
    • 2008, Markus Naerheim, The City, page 531:
      You know damned straight what this is about, or you ain't as smart as you been frontin'.
  12. (transitive, slang) To deceive or attempt to deceive someone with false or disingenuous appearances (on).
    • 1992, “So What'cha Want”, performed by The Beastie Boys:
      You think that you can front when revelation comes? / You can't front on that
  13. (transitive) To appear before.
    to front court

Translations

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See also

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Catalan

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Etymology

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Inherited from Latin frontem, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰron-t-, from *bʰren- (project). Compare Occitan front, French front, Spanish frente.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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front m (plural fronts)

  1. front
  2. forehead

Derived terms

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Further reading

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Czech

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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front m inan

  1. front (subdivision of the Soviet army)

Declension

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Further reading

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  • front in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • front in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

Danish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French front.

Noun

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front c (singular definite fronten, plural indefinite fronter)

  1. front

Declension

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Synonyms

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Dutch

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Etymology

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From Old French front (noun), fronter (verb), from Latin frons (forehead).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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front n (plural fronten, diminutive frontje n)

  1. front

Derived terms

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French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Old French front, from Latin frontem, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰron-t-, from *bʰren- (project).

Pronunciation

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Noun

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front m (plural fronts)

  1. forehead
  2. (military) front, frontline

Derived terms

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Descendants

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See also

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Further reading

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Friulian

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Etymology

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From Latin frontem, accusative singular of frōns.

Noun

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front m (plural fronts)

  1. (anatomy) forehead

Hungarian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from German Front, from French fronte, from Latin frons, frontis.[1]

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): [ˈfront]
  • Hyphenation: front
  • Rhymes: -ont

Noun

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front (plural frontok)

  1. (military) front (an area where armies are engaged in conflict)
  2. (military) a unit composed of several, normally three, army groups, cf. German Front, [2a]
  3. (meteorology) front (the interface or transition zone between two airmasses of different density)
  4. (architecture) front, face (the side of a building with the main entrance)

Declension

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Inflection (stem in -o-, back harmony)
singular plural
nominative front frontok
accusative frontot frontokat
dative frontnak frontoknak
instrumental fronttal frontokkal
causal-final frontért frontokért
translative fronttá frontokká
terminative frontig frontokig
essive-formal frontként frontokként
essive-modal
inessive frontban frontokban
superessive fronton frontokon
adessive frontnál frontoknál
illative frontba frontokba
sublative frontra frontokra
allative fronthoz frontokhoz
elative frontból frontokból
delative frontról frontokról
ablative fronttól frontoktól
non-attributive
possessive - singular
fronté frontoké
non-attributive
possessive - plural
frontéi frontokéi
Possessive forms of front
possessor single possession multiple possessions
1st person sing. frontom frontjaim
2nd person sing. frontod frontjaid
3rd person sing. frontja frontjai
1st person plural frontunk frontjaink
2nd person plural frontotok frontjaitok
3rd person plural frontjuk frontjaik

Coordinate terms

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References

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  1. ^ Tótfalusi, István. Idegenszó-tár: Idegen szavak értelmező és etimológiai szótára (’A Storehouse of Foreign Words: an explanatory and etymological dictionary of foreign words’). Budapest: Tinta Könyvkiadó, 2005. →ISBN

Indonesian

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Noun

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front (first-person possessive frontku, second-person possessive frontmu, third-person possessive frontnya)

  1. front

Kashubian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Polish front.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈfrɔnt/
  • Rhymes: -ɔnt
  • Syllabification: front

Noun

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front m inan (related adjective frontowi)

  1. front (side of a building with the main entrance)
  2. (military, law enforcement) front (foremost part of a line of soldiers or policemen)
  3. (military) front (area where armies are engaged in conflict, especially the line of contact)

Further reading

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  • Jan Trepczyk (1994) “front”, in Słownik polsko-kaszubski (in Kashubian), volumes 1–2
  • Eùgeniusz Gòłąbk (2011) “front”, in Słownik Polsko-Kaszubski / Słowôrz Pòlskò-Kaszëbsczi[4]

Maltese

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Italian fronte.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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front m (plural frontijiet)

  1. (military) front
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Middle English

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Noun

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front

  1. Alternative form of frount

Norman

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Etymology

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From Old French front, from Latin frōns, frontem.

Noun

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front m (plural fronts)

  1. (military) front

Norwegian Bokmål

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French front.

Noun

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front m (definite singular fronten, indefinite plural fronter, definite plural frontene)

  1. front

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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References

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Norwegian Nynorsk

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French front.

Noun

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front m (definite singular fronten, indefinite plural frontar, definite plural frontane)

  1. front

Synonyms

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Derived terms

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References

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Old French

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Etymology

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From Latin frōns, frontem.

Noun

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front oblique singularm (oblique plural fronz or frontz, nominative singular fronz or frontz, nominative plural front)

  1. forehead
  2. (military) front

Descendants

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Polish

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Polish Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pl

Etymology

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Internationalism; possibly borrowed from German Front, French front, or English front, ultimately from Latin frōns.[1][2] First attested in 1656–1688.[3] Compare Silesian frōnt.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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front m inan (related adjective frontowy)

  1. (military, law enforcement) front (foremost part of a line of soldiers or policemen)
  2. front (side of a building with the main entrance)
  3. (military) front (area where armies are engaged in conflict, especially the line of contact)
  4. (military) front (military unit composed of multiple armies that sits in the line of contact)
  5. (literary) front (activity against someone else's activity)
  6. (literary) front (group carrying out activity against someone else's activity)
  7. (meteorology) front (interface or transition zone between two airmasses of different density, often resulting in precipitation)
  8. front (formation of planes during a group flight)
  9. front (area of activity)
  10. (obsolete, colloquial) house facing a street
  11. (Middle Polish) front (foremost side of something or the end that faces the direction it normally moves)
    Synonym: przód

Declension

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Derived terms

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adverbs
nouns
verbs
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adverb

Descendants

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Trivia

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According to Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej (1990), front is one of the most used words in Polish, appearing 8 times in scientific texts, 20 times in news, 29 times in essays, 8 times in fiction, and 9 times in plays, each out of a corpus of 100,000 words, totaling 74 times, making it the 866th most common word in a corpus of 500,000 words.[4]

References

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  1. ^ Mirosław Bańko, Lidia Wiśniakowska (2021) “front”, in Wielki słownik wyrazów obcych, →ISBN
  2. ^ Stanisław Dubisz, editor (2003), “front”, in Uniwersalny słownik języka polskiego [Universal dictionary of the Polish language]‎[1] (in Polish), volumes 1-4, Warsaw: Wydawnictwo Naukowe PWN SA, →ISBN
  3. ^ FRONT”, in Elektroniczny Słownik Języka Polskiego XVII i XVIII Wieku [Electronic Dictionary of the Polish Language of the XVII and XVIII Century], 13.03.2009
  4. ^ Ida Kurcz (1990) “front”, in Słownik frekwencyjny polszczyzny współczesnej [Frequency dictionary of the Polish language]‎[2] (in Polish), volume 1, Kraków, Warszawa: Polska Akademia Nauk. Instytut Języka Polskiego, page 121

Further reading

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Romanian

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Etymology

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Borrowed from French front.

Noun

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front n (plural fronturi)

  1. (military) front, front line

Declension

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Serbo-Croatian

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Alternative forms

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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frȍnt m (Cyrillic spelling фро̏нт)

  1. (military) front

Declension

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Swedish

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Pronunciation

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Noun

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front c

  1. The front end or side of something.
    Bilen hade fått en ful buckla på fronten.
    "There was an ugly bump on the front of the car."
  2. front - the area were two armies are fighting each other.
    På västfronten intet nytt (All Quiet on the Western Front, book by Erich Maria Remarque)
  3. front - area were hot and cold air meet
  4. front - one aspect of a larger undertaking which is temporarily seen as a separate undertaking in order to evaluate its progress in relationship to the whole.

Declension

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Declension of front 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative front fronten fronter fronterna
Genitive fronts frontens fronters fronternas

Derived terms

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Anagrams

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