From Middle English purveu ‎(proviso), from Anglo-Norman purveuest ‎(it is provided), or purveu que ‎(provided that) (statutory language), from Old French porveu ‎(provided), past participle of porveoir ‎(to provide), from Latin prōvideō (See provide). Influenced by view and its etymological antecedants.


purview ‎(plural purviews)

  1. (law) The enacting part of a statute.
  2. (law) The scope of a statute.
  3. Scope or range of interest or control.
    • 1788, James Madison, “The Right of the Convention to Frame such a Constitution”, in The Federalist: A Commentary on the Constitution of the United States, page 255:
      Will it be said that the fundamental principles of the Confederation were not within the purview of the convention, and ought not to have been varied?
    • 2003, Nicholas Asher and Alex Lascarides, Logics of Conversation, page 7:
      Rhetorical relations have truth conditional effects that contribute to meaning but lie outside the purview of compositional semantics.
  4. Range of understanding.

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