Open main menu
See also: vidé, vidê, vidë, and viɖe

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Aphetic form of divide.[1]

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vide (third-person singular simple present vides, present participle viding, simple past and past participle vided)

  1. (US, black English)[1] divide[1] (separate into parts, cleave asunder)

VerbEdit

vide

  1. (Parliamentary jargon, imperative) Divide (ordering the members of a legislative assembly to divide into two groups (the ayes and the nays) for the counting of the members’ votes)[1]

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin vidē (see!), second-person singular present active imperative form of videō (I see).[2][3]

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vide (singular imperative verb; plural videte)

  1. See; consult; refer to. A remark directing the reader to look to the specified place for epexegesis.[2]
    • 1968, report of the royal commission on Pilotage, part 2, Study of Canadian pilotage: Pacific coast and Churchill, page 353:
      (For comments, vide page 151).

Usage notesEdit

Grammatically, this is the singular form, used to address one person. It is sometimes used invariantly to address more than one person, but a plural form also exists for this, videte.

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 vide, v.¹” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989] (dead)
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 ‖vide, v.² imp.” listed in the Oxford English Dictionary [2nd Ed.; 1989] (dead)
  3. ^ OED: [www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/vide vide], [www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/v v(.)]

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse vita (to know), from Proto-Germanic *witaną, from Proto-Indo-European *wóyde, originally a perfect form of *weyd- (see).

VerbEdit

vide (imperative vid, infinitive at vide, present tense ved, past tense vidste, perfect tense har vidst)

  1. know (be certain or sure about (something))

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse víða (widen), verbalization of víðr (wide), from Proto-Germanic *wīdaz.

VerbEdit

vide (imperative vid, infinitive at vide, present tense vider, past tense videde, perfect tense har videt)

  1. widen

Etymology 3Edit

See vid.

AdjectiveEdit

vide

  1. plural and definite singular attributive of vid

EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

vide

  1. visually, by sight

Related termsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French vuit, from Vulgar Latin *vocitus, related to vocuus, from Latin vacuus, from vacō. Cf. also vocīvus as a variant of vacivus. Compare Occitan voide, Catalan buit, English void, Italian vuoto, also Spanish vacío.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /vid/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

vide (plural vides)

  1. empty
  2. blank (page, tape)
  3. vacant; unfurnished (apartment)

NounEdit

vide m (plural vides)

  1. (empty) space
  2. vacuum, void
    L'appel du vide.
    Call of the void.
  3. emptiness
  4. gap

Related termsEdit

VerbEdit

vide

  1. first-person singular present indicative of vider
  2. third-person singular present indicative of vider
  3. first-person singular present subjunctive of vider
  4. first-person singular present subjunctive of vider
  5. second-person singular imperative of vider

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese vide, from Latin vītis, vītem.

NounEdit

vide f (plural vides)

  1. grapevine

VerbEdit

vide

  1. second-person plural imperative of vir

Alternative formsEdit


InterlinguaEdit

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vide

  1. third-person singular past historic of vedere

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

vidē

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of videō

Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vide

  1. definite singular of vid
  2. plural of vid

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

vide

  1. definite singular of vid
  2. plural of vid

AdverbEdit

vide

  1. Alternative form of vida

PortugueseEdit

 
Portuguese Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia pt

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Portuguese vide, from Latin vītis, vītem, from Proto-Indo-European *wéh₁itis (that which twines or bends, branch, switch), from *weh₁y- (to turn, wind, bend)

NounEdit

vide f (plural vides)

  1. vine, grapevine
SynonymsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

vide

  1. (formal, imperative) see; read

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse víðir, from Proto-Germanic *wīþijō, from Proto-Indo-European *wéh₁itis (that which twines or bends, branch, switch). Cognate to Dutch wijde (willow).

NounEdit

vide n

  1. willow (trees and shrubs in the genus Salix)

AdjectiveEdit

vide

  1. absolute definite natural masculine form of vid.

VenetianEdit

NounEdit

vide f pl

  1. plural of vida