EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English quaken, from Old English cwacian (to quake, tremble, chatter), from Proto-Germanic *kwakōną (to shake, quiver, tremble), from Proto-Indo-European *gʷog- (to shake, swing), related to Old English cweċċan (to shake, swing, move, vibrate, shake off, give up) (see quitch), Dutch kwakkelen (to ail, be ailing), German Quackelei (chattering), Danish kvakle (to bungle), Latin vēxō (toss, shake violently, jostle, vex), Irish bogadh (a move, movement, shift, change).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

quake (plural quakes)

  1. A trembling or shaking.
    We felt a quake in the apartment every time the train went by.
  2. An earthquake, a trembling of the ground with force.
    California is plagued by quakes; there are a few minor ones almost every month.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

quake (third-person singular simple present quakes, present participle quaking, simple past and past participle quaked or (archaic) quoke or (obsolete) quook)

  1. (intransitive) To tremble or shake.
    I felt the ground quaking beneath my feet.
  2. (intransitive, figurative) To be in a state of fear, shock, amazement, etc., such as might cause one to tremble.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

quake

  1. inflection of quaken:
    1. first-person singular present
    2. singular imperative
    3. first/third-person singular subjunctive I