Open main menu

Wiktionary β

Contents

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?] (compare Occitan tremolar), from Vulgar Latin tremulāre, present active infinitive of tremulō (compare French trembler, Spanish temblar), which is a derivate of Classical Latin tremere, present active infinitive of tremō, probably through tremulus.

VerbEdit

tremolar (first-person singular present tremolo, past participle tremolat)

  1. to tremble; to shake

ConjugationEdit


OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan [Term?], from Vulgar Latin tremulāre, present active infinitive of tremulō, which is a derivate of Classical Latin tremere, present active infinitive of tremō, probably through tremulus.

VerbEdit

tremolar

  1. to tremble; to shake

ConjugationEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably taken from an Aragonese intermediate (compare Catalan tremolar), from Vulgar Latin tremulāre, present active infinitive of tremulō, which is a derivate of Classical Latin tremere, present active infinitive of tremō, probably through tremulus. Doublet of the inherited Castilian temblar[1].

VerbEdit

tremolar

  1. to sway
  2. to flutter about
  3. (transitive) to wave

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit