GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate with Dutch kwaken (to croak), English quack.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈkvaːkən/, [ˈkʰvaːkŋ]
  • (file)

VerbEdit

quaken (weak, third-person singular present quakt, past tense quakte, past participle gequakt, auxiliary haben)

  1. (ducks) to quack
  2. (frogs) to croak

ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Friedrich Kluge (1883) , “quaken”, in John Francis Davis, transl., Etymological Dictionary of the German Language, published 1891

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English cwacian (to quake, tremble, chatter), from Proto-Germanic *kwakōną. See English quake for more.

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

quaken

  1. To tremble with fear or anger.
  2. To tremble from illness, cold, or heat.
  3. To shake; to quake.
  4. (figuratively) To be scared (as if trembling)
  5. (rare) To shift from side to side.

ConjugationEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: quake
  • Scots: quak

ReferencesEdit