See also: Tremor and trémor

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English tremour (fright), from Anglo-Norman tremour and Old French tremor, from Latin tremor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tremor (plural tremors)

  1. A shake, quiver, or vibration.
    She felt a tremor in her stomach before going on stage.
    1. A rhythmic, uncontrollable shaking of all or part of the body due to partial muscle contractions.
      The optometrist has been losing patients ever since he developed tremors in his hand.
  2. An earthquake.
    Did you feel the tremor this morning?

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

VerbEdit

tremor (third-person singular simple present tremors, present participle tremoring, simple past and past participle tremored)

  1. To shake or quiver excessively and rapidly or involuntarily; to tremble.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese tremor (13th century, Cantigas de Santa Maria), from Latin tremor.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tremor m (plural tremores)

  1. tremor
  2. agitation

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • tremor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • tremor” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • tremor” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • tremor” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.

IndonesianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English tremor, from Middle English tremour (fright), from Anglo-Norman tremour and Old French tremor, from Latin tremor.

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

tremor

  1. (medicine) A rhythmic, uncontrollable shaking of all or part of the body due to partial muscle contractions; tremor.

Further readingEdit


InterlinguaEdit

NounEdit

tremor (plural tremores)

  1. (medicine) tremor

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From tremō.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

tremor m (genitive tremōris); third declension

  1. trembling, quaking, tremor

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative tremor tremōrēs
Genitive tremōris tremōrum
Dative tremōrī tremōribus
Accusative tremōrem tremōrēs
Ablative tremōre tremōribus
Vocative tremor tremōrēs

DescendantsEdit

  • English: tremor
  • Old French: cremor
  • French: trémeur (borrowing)
  • Friulian: trimôr
  • Galician: tremor

VerbEdit

tremor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of tremō

ReferencesEdit

  • tremor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • tremor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • tremor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

tremor

  1. Alternative form of tremour

Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin tremor, probably borrowed.

NounEdit

tremor m (oblique plural tremors, nominative singular tremors, nominative plural tremor)

  1. terror; great fear

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese tremor, from Latin tremor.

PronunciationEdit

 
  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /tɾeˈmoʁ/, [tɾeˈmoh]
    • IPA(key): (São Paulo) /tɾeˈmoɾ/, [tɾeˈmoɾ]
    • IPA(key): (Rio) /tɾeˈmoʁ/, [tɾeˈmoχ]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /tɾɨˈmoɾ/, [tɾɨˈmoɾ]

  • Hyphenation: tre‧mor
  • Rhymes: -oɾ, -oʁ

NounEdit

tremor m (plural tremores)

  1. tremor
  2. agitation

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Spanish tremor (attested in El Cid), from Latin tremor. Although originally inherited, it was later used in some senses as a Latinism or Italianism (cf. tremore)[1].

NounEdit

tremor m (plural tremores)

  1. tremor, trembling

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit