See also: Reeve

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English reve, from Old English rēfa, an aphetism of ġerēfa (also groefa), from Proto-West Germanic *garāfijō (officer, official). Compare Danish greve, Swedish greve, Dutch graaf, German Graf. Role, and later word, mostly replaced by bailiff, of Anglo-Norman origin.

NounEdit

reeve (plural reeves)

  1. (historical) Any of several local officials, with varying responsibilities.
    • 1999, Bede, Judith McClure, Roger Collins, editor, The Ecclesiastical History of the English People[1], Oxford University Press, →ISBN, page 99:
      His first convert was the reeve of the city of Lincoln call Blæcca, ...
  2. (Canada) The president of a township or municipal district council.
  3. (military, historical) The holder of a proposed but unadopted commissioned rank of the Royal Air Force, equivalent to wing commander.
    • 1936, The Periodical (Oxford University Press), volumes 21–22, page 67
      A list of new titles was manufactured as follows: Ensign, Lieutenant, Flight-Leader, Squadron-Leader, Reeve, Banneret, Fourth-Ardian, Third-Ardian, Second-Ardian, Ardian, Air Marshal. [] Reeve”, perhaps, savoured a little too much of legal authority.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Apparent alternative form of reef (to pull or yank strongly, verb) or from Dutch reven (to take in, insert).

VerbEdit

reeve (third-person singular simple present reeves, present participle reeving, simple past and past participle reeved or rove)

  1. (nautical, dialect) To pass (a rope) through a hole or opening, especially so as to fasten it.
    • 1930, William Faulkner, As I Lay Dying, Library of America, 1985, p.98:
      "Let the rope go," he says. With his other hand he reaches down and reeves the two turns from the stanchion.

Etymology 3Edit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

NounEdit

reeve (plural reeves)

  1. A female of the species Philomachus pugnax, a highly gregarious, medium-sized wading bird of Eurasia; the male is a ruff.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English rēfa.

NounEdit

reeve

  1. Alternative form of reve

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English rēafian.

VerbEdit

reeve

  1. Alternative form of reven