See also: lo-cal

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English local, from Late Latin locālis (belonging to a place), possibly also via Old French local; ultimately from Latin locus (a place).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

local (comparative more local, superlative most local)

  1. From or in a nearby location.
    We prefer local produce.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 22, in The Mirror and the Lamp:
      Not unnaturally, “Auntie” took this communication in bad part. [] Next day she [] tried to recover her ward by the hair of the head. Then, thwarted, the wretched creature went to the police for help; she was versed in the law, and had perhaps spared no pains to keep on good terms with the local constabulary.
    • 2012 December 1, “An internet of airborne things”, in The Economist, volume 405, number 8813, page 3 (Technology Quarterly):
      A farmer could place an order for a new tractor part by text message and pay for it by mobile money-transfer. A supplier many miles away would then take the part to the local matternet station for airborne dispatch via drone.
    Holonyms: statal, national, federal, unional, supranational, global
  2. (computing, of a variable or identifier) Having limited scope (either lexical or dynamic); only being accessible within a certain portion of a program.
    Antonym: global
  3. (mathematics, not comparable, of a condition or state) Applying to each point in a space rather than the space as a whole.
  4. (medicine) Of or pertaining to a restricted part of an organism.
    The patient didn't want to be sedated, so we applied only local anesthesia.
    Synonym: topical
  5. Descended from an indigenous population.
    Hawaiian Pidgin is spoken by the local population.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

local (plural locals)

  1. A person who lives near a given place.
    It's easy to tell the locals from the tourists.
    • 2020 December 2, Paul Bigland, “My weirdest and wackiest Rover yet”, in Rail, page 66:
      Taunton station is busy - even more so when the inbound working of my Bristol train arrives, laden with the usual mix of 'staycationers' and locals.
  2. A branch of a nationwide organization such as a trade union.
    I'm in the TWU, too. Local 6.
  3. (rail transport, chiefly US) A train that stops at all, or almost all, stations between its origin and destination, including very small ones.
    The expresses skipped my station, so I had to take a local.
    Synonym: stopper
    Antonyms: fast, express
  4. (Britain) One's nearest or regularly frequented public house or bar.
    I got barred from my local, so I've started going all the way into town for a drink.
  5. (programming) A locally scoped identifier.
    Functional programming languages usually don't allow changing the immediate value of locals once they've been initialized, unless they're explicitly marked as being mutable.
    • 2012, Cesar Otero, ‎Rob Larsen, Professional JQuery (page 25)
      Globals are visible anywhere in your application, whereas locals are visible only in the function in which they're declared.
  6. (US, slang, journalism) An item of news relating to the place where the newspaper is published.
  7. (colloquial, medicine) Clipping of local anesthetic.
    • 1989, Road House, page 39:
      Well, Mr. Dalton, you may add nine staples to your dossier of thirty‐one broken bones, two bullet wounds, nine puncture wounds and four steel screws. That’s an estimate, of course. I’ll give you a local.
  8. (finance) An independent trader who acts for themselves rather than on behalf of investors.
    Synonym: floor trader
    • 2009, R. Stafford Johnson, Bond Evaluation, Selection, and Management (page 316)
      On most futures exchanges, there are two major types of futures traders/members: commission brokers and locals.

TranslationsEdit

AdverbEdit

local (comparative more local, superlative most local)

  1. In the local area; within a city, state, country, etc.
    It's never been more important to buy local.
    • 2016, Vinod K. Jain, Global Strategy: Competing in the Connected Economy, page 122:
      Coca-Cola, for example, shifted its stance, unsuccessfully, between “think global, act global” and “think local, act local” during the tenures of three different CEOs in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

local (epicene, plural locales)

  1. Alternative form of llocal

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin locālis, from Latin locus, attested from 1803.[1]

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

local (masculine and feminine plural locals)

  1. local

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

local m (plural locals)

  1. property, premises; business, storefront

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ “local” in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana.

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin locālis, from Latin locus

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

local (feminine singular locale, masculine plural locaux, feminine plural locales)

  1. local

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

local m (plural locaux)

  1. room

DescendantsEdit

  • Danish: lokale

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LadinEdit

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

AdjectiveEdit

local m (feminine singular locala, masculine plural locai, feminine plural locales)

  1. local

PiedmonteseEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

local

  1. local

NounEdit

local m

  1. room

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin locālis, from Latin locus. Cognate with the inherited lugar.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): (Brazil) /loˈkaw/, [loˈkaʊ̯]
  • IPA(key): (Portugal) /luˈkal/, [luˈkaɫ]

  • Hyphenation: lo‧cal
  • Rhymes: -al, -aw

AdjectiveEdit

local m or f (plural locais, comparable)

  1. local

NounEdit

local m (plural locais)

  1. premises, rooms
  2. site
  3. place, location

SynonymsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French local, Late Latin localis.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

local m or n (feminine singular locală, masculine plural locali, feminine and neuter plural locale)

  1. local

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin locālis, from Latin locus. Compare the inherited doublet lugar.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /loˈkal/, [loˈkal]
  • Hyphenation: lo‧cal

AdjectiveEdit

local (plural locales)

  1. local

Derived termsEdit

NounEdit

local m (plural locales)

  1. premises, rooms
  2. (Mexico) store or other retail unit in a shopping center

Derived termsEdit