See also: lo-cal

English edit

Etymology edit

From Middle English local, from Late Latin locālis (belonging to a place), possibly also via Old French local; ultimately from Latin locus (a place).

The ring-theoretic senses derive from Krull, who first referred to Noetherian commutative rings with a unique maximal ideal as "Stellenring" (Stellen (place) +‎ ring) in 1938.[1] The term was inspired by algebraic geometry, where local rings encode information about the behavior of curves (surfaces, etc.) at points; hence, describe "local" behavior.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

local (comparative more local, superlative most local)

  1. From or in a nearby location.
    Holonyms: statal, national, federal, unional, supranational, global
    We prefer local produce.
    • 1918, W[illiam] B[abington] Maxwell, chapter XXII, in The Mirror and the Lamp, Indianapolis, Ind.: The Bobbs-Merrill Company, →OCLC:
      Not unnaturally, “Auntie” took this communication in bad part. [] Next day she [] tried to recover her ward by the hair of the head. Then, thwarted, the wretched creature went to the police for help; she was versed in the law, and had perhaps spared no pains to keep on good terms with the local constabulary.
    • 2012 December 1, “An internet of airborne things”, in The Economist, volume 405, number 8813, page 3 (Technology Quarterly):
      A farmer could place an order for a new tractor part by text message and pay for it by mobile money-transfer. A supplier many miles away would then take the part to the local matternet station for airborne dispatch via drone.
  2. (computing, of a resource) Connected directly to a particular computer, processor, etc.; able to be accessed offline.
    Antonym: remote
    local disk drive
    local file
    The panel shows both local and remote sites.
  3. (computing, of a variable or identifier) Having limited scope (either lexical or dynamic); only accessible within a certain portion of a program.
    Antonym: global
  4. (mathematics, not comparable, of a condition or property) Applying to or satisfied by substructures understood as "near points;" in particular:
    1. (topology) Satisfied by at least one open neighborhood of every point.
      A Hausdorff space satisfying local compactness need not be (globally) compact!
    2. (topology) Satisfied by arbitrarily small open neighborhoods of every point.
    3. (group theory, of a property of an infinite group) Satisfied by every finitely generated subgroup.
  5. (mathematics, not comparable, of a condition or property) Detectable from the behavior of substructures understood to be "near points;" in particular:
    1. (algebra, algebraic geometry, of a property   of a ring   (or an  -module  )) Such that the following conditions are equivalent: (1)   holds for   ( ); (2)   holds for the localization   ( ) for all prime ideals   of  ; (3)   holds for the localization   ( ) for all maximal ideals   of  .
      Flatness is a local property.
    2. (group theory, of a property of a finite group) Detectable from the behavior of the normalizers of the nontrivial p-subgroups.
  6. (algebra, of a ring) Having a unique maximal (left) ideal.
  7. (medicine) Of or pertaining to a restricted part of an organism.
    Synonym: topical
    local lesion
    The patient didn't want to be sedated, so we applied only local anesthesia.
  8. Descended from an indigenous population.
    Hawaiian Pidgin is spoken by the local population.

Translations edit

Noun edit

local (plural locals)

  1. A person who lives near a given place.
    It's easy to tell the locals from the tourists.
    • 2020 December 2, Paul Bigland, “My weirdest and wackiest Rover yet”, in Rail, page 66:
      Taunton station is busy - even more so when the inbound working of my Bristol train arrives, laden with the usual mix of 'staycationers' and locals.
  2. A branch of a nationwide organization such as a trade union.
    I'm in the TWU, too. Local 6.
  3. (rail transport) Clipping of local train.
    The expresses skipped my station, so I had to take a local.
    Synonym: stopper
    Antonyms: fast, express
  4. (Britain) One's nearest or regularly frequented public house or bar.
    I got barred from my local, so I've started going all the way into town for a drink.
    • 2010, “Nothing”, in Science & Faith, performed by The Script:
      As they take me to my local down the street.
  5. (programming) A locally scoped identifier.
    Functional programming languages usually don't allow changing the immediate value of locals once they've been initialized, unless they're explicitly marked as being mutable.
    • 2012, Cesar Otero, Rob Larsen, Professional jQuery, page 25:
      Globals are visible anywhere in your application, whereas locals are visible only in the function in which they're declared.
  6. (US, slang, journalism) An item of news relating to the place where the newspaper is published.
  7. (colloquial, medicine) Clipping of local anesthetic.
    • 1989, Road House, page 39:
      Well, Mr. Dalton, you may add nine staples to your dossier of thirty‐one broken bones, two bullet wounds, nine puncture wounds and four steel screws. That’s an estimate, of course. I’ll give you a local.
  8. (finance) An independent trader who acts for themselves rather than on behalf of investors.
    Synonym: floor trader
    • 2009, R. Stafford Johnson, Bond Evaluation, Selection, and Management, page 316:
      On most futures exchanges, there are two major types of futures traders/members: commission brokers and locals.
  9. (fandom slang, derogatory) A Twitter user who is not a part of Stan Twitter.
    • 2018, Max Ghasserani, "Spill The Tea On A Sister Skinny Legend", The Investigator (Green Valley High School, Henderson, NV), October 2018, page 25:
      Her camera roll is filled with pictures and videos of her idol, she doesn't let any of her friends see her account because "no locals allowed", []
    • 2018 October 16, Fergal Smiddy, “The 6 Types of People You Meet on Twitter”, in University Express, University College Cork, Ireland, page 11:
      Locals are characterised by their seeming lack of involvement or ~expertise~ on the platform.
    • 2019, Avin Abelardo, "Deep Dive Into The World Of Troll Twitter Memes", Echoes (University of the Philippines), February/March 2019, page 60:
      Heck, even locals sometimes use GIFs of her when they feel like tweeting with taste.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:local.

Translations edit

Adverb edit

local (comparative more local, superlative most local)

  1. In the local area; within a city, state, country, etc.
    It's never been more important to buy local.
    • 2016, Vinod K. Jain, Global Strategy: Competing in the Connected Economy, page 122:
      Coca-Cola, for example, shifted its stance, unsuccessfully, between “think global, act global” and “think local, act local” during the tenures of three different CEOs in the late 1990s and early 2000s.

Derived terms edit

Terms derived from local (all parts of speech)

Related terms edit

References edit

  1. ^ Krull, Wolfgang. "Dimensionstheorie in Stellenringen [47]". Volume 1+2, edited by Paulo Ribenboim, Berlin, Boston: De Gruyter, 1999, pp. 730-734. https://doi.org/10.1515/9783110801026.730

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Asturian edit

Adjective edit

local (epicene, plural locales)

  1. Alternative form of llocal

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin locālis, from Latin locus. First attested in 1803.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

local m or f (masculine and feminine plural locals)

  1. local

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Noun edit

local m (plural locals)

  1. property, premises; business, storefront

References edit

  1. ^ local”, in Gran Diccionari de la Llengua Catalana, Grup Enciclopèdia Catalana, 2024

Further reading edit

Chinese edit

Etymology edit

From English local.

Pronunciation edit


Noun edit

local

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese or overseas Mandarin) local (people, as opposed to foreigners)

References edit

Fala edit

Etymology edit

From Late Latin locālis, from Latin locus.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

local (plural locais)

  1. local

Noun edit

local m (plural locais)

  1. premises; rooms

References edit

  • Valeš, Miroslav (2021) Diccionariu de A Fala: lagarteiru, mañegu, valverdeñu (web)[1], 2nd edition, Minde, Portugal: CIDLeS, published 2022, →ISBN

French edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin locālis, from Latin locus.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

local (feminine locale, masculine plural locaux, feminine plural locales)

  1. local
    Antonym: global

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Noun edit

local m (plural locaux)

  1. room

Descendants edit

  • Danish: lokale
  • Romanian: local
  • Turkish: lokal

Further reading edit

Anagrams edit

Galician edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin locālis, from Latin locus.

Adjective edit

local m or f (plural locais)

  1. local

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Noun edit

local m (plural locais)

  1. premises; rooms

References edit

  • local” in DIGALEGO - Dicionario de Galego, Ir Indo 2004, Xunta de Galicia 2013.
  • local” in Dicionario da Real Academia Galega, Royal Galician Academy.
  • local” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.

Ladin edit

Pronunciation edit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

Adjective edit

local m (feminine singular locala, masculine plural locai, feminine plural locales)

  1. local

Lombard edit

Pronunciation edit

  • (Milanese) IPA(key): /luˈcaːl/

Adjective edit

local (plural locai)

  1. local

Piedmontese edit

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

local

  1. local

Noun edit

local m

  1. room

Portuguese edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin locālis, from Latin locus. Cognate with the inherited lugar.

Pronunciation edit

 

  • Rhymes: -al, -aw
  • Hyphenation: lo‧cal

Adjective edit

local m or f (plural locais)

  1. local

Noun edit

local m (plural locais)

  1. premises, rooms
  2. site
  3. place, location

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French local, Late Latin localis. By surface analysis, loc +‎ -al.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

local m or n (feminine singular locală, masculine plural locali, feminine and neuter plural locale)

  1. local

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Spanish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from Late Latin locālis, from Latin locus. Compare the inherited doublet lugar.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /loˈkal/ [loˈkal]
  • Audio (Venezuela):(file)
  • Rhymes: -al
  • Syllabification: lo‧cal

Adjective edit

local m or f (masculine and feminine plural locales)

  1. local

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

local m (plural locales)

  1. premises, rooms
  2. (Mexico) store or other retail unit in a shopping center

Derived terms edit

Further reading edit