See also: røve and röve

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Probably from Middle English *roven, a Midlands variant of Northern Middle English raven (to wander), from Old Norse ráfa (to rove; stray about). Cognate with Icelandic ráfa (to wander), Scots rave (to wander; stray; roam).

VerbEdit

rove (third-person singular simple present roves, present participle roving, simple past and past participle roved)

  1. (obsolete, intransitive) To shoot with arrows (at).
  2. (intransitive) To roam, or wander about at random, especially over a wide area.
  3. (transitive) To roam or wander through.
  4. (transitive) To card wool or other fibres.
    • 1835, Andrew Ure, The Philosophy of Manufacturers:
      Although both [flax and wool] must be roved and spun upon similar principles, each requires peculiar modifications in its machinery.
  5. To twist slightly; to bring together, as slivers of wool or cotton, and twist slightly before spinning.
  6. To draw through an eye or aperture.
  7. To plough into ridges by turning the earth of two furrows together.
  8. To practice robbery on the seas; to voyage about on the seas as a pirate.
    • 1589, Richard Hakluyt, The Principall Navigations, Voiages, and Discoveries of the English Nation, [], London: [] George Bishop and Ralph Newberie, deputies to Christopher Barker, [], OCLC 753964576:
      pirates, roving up and downe the sea
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

rove (plural roves)

  1. A copper washer upon which the end of a nail is clinched in boatbuilding.
  2. A roll or sliver of wool or cotton drawn out and lightly twisted, preparatory to further processing; a roving.
  3. The act of wandering; a ramble.

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected forms.

VerbEdit

rove

  1. simple past tense of rive
  2. simple past tense of reeve

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

rove

  1. (archaic) singular present subjunctive of roven

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Finnic *robeh (compare Ingrian rove, Karelian roveh, Veps robeh). Probably derived from the onomatopoeic root of ropista.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈroʋeˣ/, [ˈro̞ʋe̞(ʔ)]
  • Rhymes: -oʋe
  • Syllabification(key): ro‧ve

NounEdit

rove

  1. Small container made of birch bark.
    Synonym: tuokkonen
    • 1891, Juhana Kokko, Kruunun Metsissä, →ISBN:
      Sillä välin hän sitoi haavansa, otti sitten ropeen, joi raikasta vettä ja varustausi matkalle.
      In the meanwhile, he dressed his wounds before taking a rove, drinking fresh water and preparing for the trip.
    1. (by extension) A container of similar size but any material, when used to store mämmi (a traditional fasting dish).
      • 2016 March 27, Teemu Stubin, “Juha Miedon mämmiurakka lähti käsistä: Yli 48 000 kilokalorin pommi!”, in Iltalehti:
        24 rovetta oli jätetty tuohon oven eteen, Mieto kertoo.
        24 roves had been left right there before my door, explains Mieto.

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of rove (Kotus type 48*E/hame, p-v gradation)
nominative rove ropeet
genitive ropeen ropeiden
ropeitten
partitive rovetta ropeita
illative ropeeseen ropeisiin
ropeihin
singular plural
nominative rove ropeet
accusative nom. rove ropeet
gen. ropeen
genitive ropeen ropeiden
ropeitten
partitive rovetta ropeita
inessive ropeessa ropeissa
elative ropeesta ropeista
illative ropeeseen ropeisiin
ropeihin
adessive ropeella ropeilla
ablative ropeelta ropeilta
allative ropeelle ropeille
essive ropeena ropeina
translative ropeeksi ropeiksi
instructive ropein
abessive ropeetta ropeitta
comitative ropeineen
Possessive forms of rove (type hame)
possessor singular plural
1st person ropeeni ropeemme
2nd person ropeesi ropeenne
3rd person ropeensa

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Itkonen, Erkki; Kulonen, Ulla-Maija, editors (1992–2000) Suomen sanojen alkuperä [The origin of Finnish words]‎[1] (in Finnish), [note: linked online version also includes some other etymological sources], Helsinki: Institute for the Languages of Finland/Finnish Literature Society, →ISBN

AnagramsEdit