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See also: Ree, REE, r'ee, and re'e

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

ree (plural rees)

  1. Alternative form of rei

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English rei, reh, reoh, from Old English hrēoh (rough, fierce, wild, angry, disturbed, troubled, stormy, tempestuous), from Proto-Germanic *hreuhaz (bad, wild), from Proto-Indo-European *krewh₂- (raw meat, fresh blood). Cognate with Scots ree, rae, ray (ree), Old Saxon hrē (evil, bad, angry), Gothic 𐍂𐌰𐌿𐌷𐍄𐌾𐌰𐌽 (rauhtjan, to become angry, rage against). Related to Old English hrēaw (raw, uncooked). More at raw.

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ree (comparative reer or more ree, superlative reest or most ree)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal) Wild; fierce; outrageous; overexcited; frenzied; delirious; crazy.
    • 1756, Calderwood, Margaret, “Mrs Calderwood's Journey”, in The Coltness Collections: MDCVIII-MDCCCXL, The Maitland Club, published 1842, page 222:
      "I saw,", says I, "he was a ree-brained divell, but thought nothing of it, as all the British are so when they come abroad."
  2. (now chiefly dialectal) Befuddled with liquor; half-drunk; tipsy.
    • 1839, Robertson, Joseph, The Book of Bon-Accord: or, A Guide to the City of Aberdeen, footnote, page 94:
      One of the witnesses speaks of having seen this sober judge "upon the bench, when he appeared to be ree, and as if he had been drunk the night before."
SynonymsEdit

NounEdit

ree (plural rees)

  1. (now chiefly dialectal) A state of befuddlement; intoxication.
  2. (now chiefly dialectal) A state of great excitement or frenzy.

VerbEdit

ree (third-person singular simple present rees, present participle reeing, simple past and past participle reed)

  1. (intransitive, now chiefly dialectal) To become extremely excited; fly into a rage.
  2. (transitive, now chiefly dialectal) To drive into a state of excitement; fire with enthusiasm.

Etymology 3Edit

Compare riddle (a sieve).

VerbEdit

ree (third-person singular simple present rees, present participle reeing, simple past and past participle reed)

  1. (obsolete, Britain, dialectal) To riddle; to sift; to separate or throw off.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Mortimer to this entry?)

AnagramsEdit


AfrikaansEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Dutch ree, from Middle Dutch ree, from Old Dutch rēa.

NounEdit

ree (plural reë)

  1. roe, deer of the genus Capreolus

Derived termsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch ree, from Old Dutch rēa. This etymology is incomplete. You can help Wiktionary by elaborating on the origins of this term.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /reː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: ree
  • Rhymes: -eː

NounEdit

ree f or n (plural reeën, diminutive reetje n)

  1. The roe, Capreolus capreolus.
  2. Any deer of the genus Capreolus.

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

re- +‎ -e

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

ree

  1. again

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ree f pl

  1. feminine plural of reo

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

NounEdit

ree m

  1. vocative singular of reus

ManxEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Irish , from Proto-Celtic *rīxs, from Proto-Indo-European *h₃rḗǵs (ruler, king).

NounEdit

ree m (genitive singular ree, plural reeghyn or reeaghyn)

  1. king (monarchy, chess, card games, draughts)
    Jean eh cooie da ree.Make it fit for a king.
    Keayrt dy row va ree ayn.There was once a king.
    My vees yn ree hene eh, cha nel kiart echey ayns Mannin.King or no king, he has no right to be in Mann.
    T' eh jeh sluight reeghyn Vannin.He is descended from the kings of Mann.

Derived termsEdit