See also: REU, réu, rêu, and re'u

CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin reus (accused). Compare Portuguese réu and Spanish reo.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

reu m (plural reus, feminine rea)

  1. defendant (as in a trial)

AdjectiveEdit

reu (feminine rea, masculine plural reus, feminine plural rees)

  1. accused, guilty (of a crime)

Further readingEdit


ChineseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From clipping of English reunion.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɹiː²² juː⁵⁵/

VerbEdit

re⫽u (verb-object)

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) to reunion with friends (typically from university)

VerbEdit

reu

  1. (Hong Kong Cantonese) to reunion with friends (typically from university)

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch reude, possibly from Proto-Germanic *hruþjô (large dog, hound), itself possibly from *hruttōną (to roar), from a Proto-Indo-European root shared by Ancient Greek κόρυζα (kóruza), Old English hrot. Or, from Proto-Germanic *hreutaną, *hrūtaną, *hruttōną (to snore), which would be related to Old Norse hrjóta.

Cognate to German Rüde.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /røː/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: reu
  • Rhymes: -øː

NounEdit

reu m (plural reuen or reus, diminutive reutje n, feminine teef)

  1. male dog or other canine
    Synonym: rekel

ReferencesEdit

  • Kroonen, Guus (2013), “hruþjan”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Germanic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 11), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN
  • van der Sijs, Nicoline, editor (2010), “reu”, in Etymologiebank, Meertens Institute

Southwestern DinkaEdit

NumeralEdit

reu

  1. two

ReferencesEdit

  • Dinka-English Dictionary[1], 2005

West MakianEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

reu

  1. (transitive) to carry on the shoulders

ConjugationEdit

Conjugation of reu (action verb)
singular plural
inclusive exclusive
1st person tereu mereu areu
2nd person nereu fereu
3rd person inanimate ireu dereu
animate
imperative nereu, reu fereu, reu

ReferencesEdit

  • Clemens Voorhoeve (1982) The Makian languages and their neighbours[2], Pacific linguistics