See also: reo- and re'o

Contents

IrishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Irish reód, from Old Irish réud, from Proto-Celtic *ɸreswos, from Proto-Indo-European *prews-.

NounEdit

reo m ‎(genitive singular reo)

  1. verbal noun of reoigh(freeze; congeal, solidify)
  2. frost
DeclensionEdit
Alternative formsEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

reo f, m ‎(genitive singular reo, nominative plural reoanna)

  1. Alternative form of (moon; period; space, intervening distance)
DeclensionEdit
Feminine
Masculine

External linksEdit

  • "reo" in Foclóir Gaeilge-Béarla, An Gúm, 1977, by Niall Ó Dónaill.
  • reód” in Dictionary of the Irish Language, Royal Irish Academy, 1913–76.

ItalianEdit

 reo on Italian Wikipedia

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin reus(defendant, accused). Cognate to Italian rio(bad), inherited from the same source.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈrɛ.o/
  • Rhymes: -ɛo
  • Hyphenation: rè‧o

AdjectiveEdit

reo m ‎(feminine singular rea, masculine plural rei, feminine plural ree) (di)

  1. guilty (of)

NounEdit

reo m ‎(plural rei)

  1. offender

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

MaoriEdit

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

Cognate to Old Norse hræ.

NounEdit

rēo n

  1. corpse

RarotonganEdit

SpanishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin reus(accused). Compare Portuguese réu .

NounEdit

reo m ‎(plural reos, feminine rea)

  1. defendant (as in a trial)

AdjectiveEdit

reo m ‎(feminine singular rea, masculine plural reos, feminine plural reas)

  1. Accused of a crime.
  2. Found guilty of a crime.

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin rhēdo.

NounEdit

reo m ‎(plural reos)

  1. sea trout

Etymology 3Edit

Unknown; compare Catalan reu.

NounEdit

reo m ‎(plural reos)

  1. A turn in a game.

TahitianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *leo.

NounEdit

reo

  1. language