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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French risible. from Late Latin rīsibilis, rīsus (laughter) + -ibilis, from the perfect passive participle of rīdeō (laugh).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɪzɪbəl/, /ˈɹaɪzəbəl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

risible (comparative more risible, superlative most risible)

  1. Of or pertaining to laughter
    the risible muscles
    • 1912, Arthur Quiller-Couch, Hocken and Hunken, ch. 20:
      A joke merely affected her with silent convulsive twitchings, as though the risible faculties struggled somewhere within her but could not bring the laugh to birth.
  2. Provoking laughter; ludicrous; ridiculous; humorously insignificant
  3. (of a person) Easily laughing; prone to laughter
    • Dr H. More
      It has been made the definition of man that he is risible.
    • 1897, Thomas Hardy, The Well-Beloved. ch. 8:
      She was half risible, half concerned.

SynonymsEdit

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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin rīsibilis, from rīdeō (to laugh).

PronunciationEdit

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AdjectiveEdit

risible (plural risibles)

  1. risible, laughable

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Late Latin rīsibilis, from rīdeō (to laugh)

AdjectiveEdit

risible (plural risibles)

  1. risible, laughable