ridicule

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈɹɪdɪkjuːl/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: rid‧i‧cule

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French ridicule, from Latin ridiculus (laughable, comical, amusing, absurd, ridiculous), from ridere (to laugh).

VerbEdit

ridicule (third-person singular simple present ridicules, present participle ridiculing, simple past and past participle ridiculed)

  1. (transitive) to criticize or disapprove of someone or something through scornful jocularity; to make fun of
    His older sibling constantly ridiculed him with sarcastic remarks.
SynonymsEdit
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NounEdit

ridicule (countable and uncountable, plural ridicules)

  1. derision; mocking or humiliating words or behaviour
    • 1738, Alexander Pope, Epilogue to the Satires: Dialogue II
      Safe from the Bar, the Pulpit, and the Throne, / Yet touch'd and sham'd by Ridicule alone.
  2. An object of sport or laughter; a laughing stock.
    • 1857, Henry Thomas Buckle, History of Civilization in England
      [Marlborough] was so miserably ignorant, that his deficiencies made him the ridicule of his contemporaries.
    • 1563, John Foxe, Actes and Monuments
      To the people [] but a trifle, to the king but a ridicule.
  3. The quality of being ridiculous; ridiculousness.
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Related termsEdit
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AdjectiveEdit

ridicule (comparative more ridicule, superlative most ridicule)

  1. (obsolete) ridiculous
    • late 17th century, John Aubrey, Brief Lives
      This action [] became so ridicule.

Etymology 2Edit

From French ridicule, probably jocular alteration of réticule.

NounEdit

ridicule (plural ridicules)

  1. (now historical) A small woman's handbag; a reticule. [from 18th c.]
    • c. 1825, Frances Burney, Journals and Letters, Penguin 2001, p. 455:
      I hastily drew my empty hand from my Ridicule.
    • 1838, Charles Dickens, Oliver Twist:
      ‘Pockets, women's ridicules, houses, mailcoaches [] ,’ said Mr. Claypole.

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin ridiculus.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

ridicule (plural ridicules)

  1. ridiculous (all meanings)

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Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From rīdiculus (laughable; ridiculous), from rīdeō (to laugh; mock).

AdverbEdit

rīdiculē (comparative rīdiculius, superlative rīdiculissimē)

  1. laughably, amusingly
  2. absurdly, ridiculously

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ridicule in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ridicule in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • ridicule in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette