EnglishEdit

 
Primula vulgaris has unusually rugose leaves

EtymologyEdit

From Latin rūgōsus (wrinkled).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rugose (comparative more rugose, superlative most rugose)

  1. Having rugae or wrinkles, creases, ridges, or corrugation.
  2. (figuratively, rare) Rugged, rough, unrefined.
  3. (botany) Having a rough, wrinkled, or wavy surface; commonly in parasynthetic usage e.g. rugose-veined or rugose-leaved.
    • 1751, Anonymous, A General Natural History: Or, New and Accurate Descriptions Of The Animals, Vegetables, and Minerals, Of the Different Parts of the World[1], Thomas Osborne, pages 261–:
      Petraea foliis rugosis ovatis. The oval, rugose-leaved Petraea. The root is brachiated; the shrub rises to ten feet high: the leaves are three inches long, an inch and a half broad, even at the edges, and very rough to the touch: (Note: In modern nomenclature, the plant in question probably is Petrea rugosa, as the spelling "Petraea" does not seem to match any extant genus,)
    • 1866, Botanical Society of Edinburgh, Transactions of the Botanical Society[2], pages 459–:
      The original leaves were flat and very rugose, and almost hid by the numerous single-stemmed flowers; while the leaves produced in the umbellate state were larger, more upright, and less wrinkled.
  4. (paleontology) Describing a fossil coral of the extinct order †Rugosa (also called Tetracoralla), this order has horn-shaped corals with surfaces covered with ridges.
  5. (entomology) Used when combined with another adjective, for example, rugose-reticulate or rugose-punctate.

SynonymsEdit

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ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rugose

  1. feminine plural of rugoso

LatinEdit

AdjectiveEdit

rūgōse

  1. vocative masculine singular of rūgōsus