See also: -sæta, saeta, säta, and sœta

IcelandicEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse sæta (woman who awaits her husband’s return; dung heap), from Proto-Germanic *sētijǭ, derived from *sitjaną (to sit).

NounEdit

sæta f (genitive singular sætu, nominative plural sætur)

  1. (poetic) woman, girl
  2. a woman who awaits her husband’s return from a voyage.
  3. (in compounds) An agent noun for sitja and its compounds or otherwise denoting someone who sits, waits or is situated; sitter.
    E.g. fyrirsæta (model), i.e. “one who models/poses”, from sitja fyrir (to pose, model)
DeclensionEdit
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *swōtijǭ, from *swōtuz (sweet).

NounEdit

sæta f (genitive singular sætu, no plural)

  1. sweetness
DeclensionEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Old Norse sæta, from Proto-Germanic *sētijaną.

VerbEdit

sæta (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative sætti, supine sætt)

  1. (with dative) to take advantage of, make use of some opportunity
  2. (with dative) to be an occasion for some opinion or emotion; be met with, be considered
    sæta furðu
    be met with astonishment
    sæta tíðindum
    be considered news, be newsworthy
  3. (with dative) to endure, undergo
    sæta refsingu
    to endure punishment, be punished
    sæta ábyrgð
    to be held responsible
  4. (with dative, chiefly with negation) to tolerate
  5. (with dative) to pay attention to
  6. (with dative) to be of a specified degree, duration or amount
    svo vikum sætir
    for weeks on end
  7. (with accusative) to stack hay; make it into a haystack
    1919, Þorvaldur Thoroddsen, Lýsing Íslands[1], volume 3, Copenhagen: Hið íslenzka Bókmentafélag, page 133:
    Í Frey XI, 1914, bls. 46–48, er stungið upp á að sæta hey á grindum til þess að verja heyið jarðraka og svo vel blási undir það.
    In Freyr (a publication) vol. XI, 1914, pp. 46–48, it is suggested that hay be stacked on lattices in order to protect the hay from ground moisture and so that there is a good breeze under it.
ConjugationEdit

Etymology 4Edit

From Old Norse sœta, from Proto-Germanic *swōtijaną, from *swōtuz (sweet).

VerbEdit

sæta (weak verb, third-person singular past indicative sætti, supine sætt)

  1. to sweeten
ConjugationEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old Norse sæta (to waylay).

Alternative formsEdit

  • sæte (e and split infinitives)

VerbEdit

sæta (present tense sæter, past tense sætte, past participle sætt, passive infinitive sætast, present participle sætande, imperative sæt)

  1. (transitive) to obey, submit to
  2. (intransitive) to be worthy of submission, respect
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From såte (a heap of hey).

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

sæta (present tense sæter, past tense sætte, past participle sætt, passive infinitive sætast, present participle sætande, imperative sæt)

  1. to pile (hey) into heaps

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

NounEdit

sæta f

  1. definite singular of sæte

sæta n

  1. definite plural of sæte

ReferencesEdit


Old NorseEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Proto-Germanic *sētijaną.

VerbEdit

sæta (past indicative sætti, past participle sættr)

  1. (with dative) to sit in ambush for; waylay
  2. (with dative) to undergo, expose oneself to
  3. (with dative) to bring about, cause
  4. (with dative) to amount to, be equivalent to
ConjugationEdit
DescendantsEdit
  • Icelandic: sæta
  • Norwegian Nynorsk: sæta, sæte

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Germanic *sētijǭ

NounEdit

sæta f (genitive sætu)

  1. a woman whose husband has gone out of the country
DeclensionEdit
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

See the etymology of the main entry.

NounEdit

sæta

  1. indefinite genitive plural of sæti

ReferencesEdit

  • sæta in A Concise Dictionary of Old Icelandic, G. T. Zoëga, Clarendon Press, 1910, at Internet Archive.