See also: սարդ

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English sarde, borrowed from Old French sarde, from Latin sarda, sardius. Doublet of sardius.

NounEdit

sard (countable and uncountable, plural sards)

  1. (mineralogy) A variety of carnelian, of a rich reddish yellow or brownish red color.
  2. Any of various brownish red earth pigments formerly used in cosmetics and painting; has more yellow, hardly any blue (see puce), is lighter than russet and darker than traditional carnelian.

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English serden, from Old English seorðan, borrowed from Old Norse serða, from Proto-Germanic *serþaną, from Proto-Indo-European *sert- (to hit).

VerbEdit

sard (third-person singular simple present sards, present participle sarding, simple past and past participle sarded)

  1. (obsolete) To have sexual intercourse with (a woman).
    Synonyms: fuck, jape, swive; see also Thesaurus:copulate with

Further readingEdit

  • John Stephen Farmer, William Ernest Henley, Slang and Its Analogues Past and Present (1903), page 101

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Latin sardus.

AdjectiveEdit

sard (feminine sarda, masculine plural sards, feminine plural sardes)

  1. Sardinian (pertaining to Sardinia, to the Sardinian people, or to the Sardinian language)

NounEdit

sard m (plural sards, feminine sarda)

  1. Sardinian (an inhabitant of Sardinia)

sard m (uncountable)

  1. Sardinian (a Romance language indigenous to Sardinia)
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

By confusion with sard (Sardinian), from sarg, from Latin sargus.

NounEdit

sard m (plural sards)

  1. white seabream (a fish of species Diplodus sargus)
    Synonym: sarg

Further readingEdit


Central KurdishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Related to Persian سرد(sard) from Middle Persian slt'.

AdjectiveEdit

sard (sard)

  1. cold