satchel

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

First recorded circa 1340 as Middle English sachel, from Old French sachel, from Late Latin saccellum (money bag, purse), a diminutive of Latin sacculus, itself a diminutive of saccus (bag). See sack.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsætʃəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ætʃəl

NounEdit

satchel (plural satchels)

 
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  1. A bag or case with one or two shoulder straps, especially used to carry books etc.
    • "Come, now, take yourselves off, like good boys and girls," he said; and the whole assemblage, dark and light, disappeared through a door into a large verandah, followed by Eva, who carried a large satchel, which she had been filling with apples, nuts, candy, ribbons, laces, and toys of every description, during her whole homeward journey.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

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Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

satchel

  1. Alternative form of sachel