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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin saccus (sack, bag), from Ancient Greek σάκκος (sákkos, bag of coarse cloth), from Semitic.

NounEdit

saccus (plural sacci)

  1. (botany) A bladder or wing-like structure found on the pollen grains of many species of conifer. The shape or number of the sacci on a pollen grain can help identify the species it came from.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Ancient Greek σάκκος (sákkos, sack, bag; sackcloth), from Semitic.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

saccus m (genitive saccī); second declension

  1. A sack, bag; purse, wallet.
  2. A garment of sackcloth or haircloth.

InflectionEdit

Second declension.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative saccus saccī
Genitive saccī saccōrum
Dative saccō saccīs
Accusative saccum saccōs
Ablative saccō saccīs
Vocative sacce saccī

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Romanian: sac
  • Sardinian: sacu
  • Sicilian: saccu
  • Spanish: saco
    • Southeastern Tepehuan: saaku
  • Albanian: sak
  • Germanic: *sakkuz (see there for further descendants)
  • Welsh: sach

ReferencesEdit

  • saccus in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • saccus in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • saccus in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition, 1883–1887)
  • saccus in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • saccus in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • saccus in William Smith, editor (1848) A Dictionary of Greek Biography and Mythology, London: John Murray
  • saccus in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin