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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Alteration of save, sabi (know) (in English-based creoles and pidgins), from Portuguese or Spanish sabe ([she/he] knows), from saber (to know), from Latin sapere (to be wise).

1785, as a noun, “practical sense, intelligence”; also a verb, “to know, to understand”; West Indies pidgin borrowing of French savez(-vous) (do you know) or Spanish sabe (usted) (you know), both from Vulgar Latin *sapere, from Latin sapere (be wise, be knowing) (see sapient). The adjective is first recorded 1905, from the noun.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

savvy (comparative savvier, superlative savviest)

  1. (informal) Shrewd, well-informed and perceptive.
    • 22 March 2012, Scott Tobias, AV Club The Hunger Games[1]
      That such a safe adaptation could come of The Hunger Games speaks more to the trilogy’s commercial ascent than the book’s actual content, which is audacious and savvy in its dark calculations.

SynonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

savvy (third-person singular simple present savvies, present participle savvying, simple past and past participle savvied)

  1. (informal) To understand.

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

savvy (uncountable)

  1. Shrewdness

ReferencesEdit