See also: SMART, Smart, smärt, and S.M.A.R.T.

English edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle English smerten, from Old English smeortan (to smart), from Proto-West Germanic *smertan, from Proto-Germanic *smertaną (to hurt, ache), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)merd- (to bite, sting). Cognate with Scots smert, Dutch smarten, German schmerzen, Danish smerte, Swedish smärta.

Verb edit

smart (third-person singular simple present smarts, present participle smarting, simple past smarted or (obsolete) smort, past participle smarted or (obsolete) smorten)

  1. (intransitive) To hurt or sting.
    After being hit with a pitch, the batter exclaimed "Ouch, my arm smarts!"
    • 1897, Bram Stoker, chapter 21, in Dracula, New York, N.Y.: Modern Library, →OCLC:
      He moved convulsively, and as he did so, said, "I'll be quiet, Doctor. Tell them to take off the strait waistcoat. I have had a terrible dream, and it has left me so weak that I cannot move. What's wrong with my face? It feels all swollen, and it smarts dreadfully."
  2. (transitive) To cause a smart or sting in.
    • a. 1652, Thomas Adams, Faith’s Encouragement:
      A goad that [] smarts the flesh.
  3. (intransitive) To feel a pungent pain of mind; to feel sharp pain or grief; be punished severely; to feel the sting of evil.
Derived terms edit
Translations edit

Etymology 2 edit

From Middle English smert, smart, from Old English smeart (smarting, smart, painful), from Proto-Germanic *smartaz (hurting, aching), from Proto-Indo-European *(s)merd- (to bite, sting). Cognate with Scots smert (painful, smart), Old Frisian smert (sharp, painful).

Adjective edit

smart (comparative smarter or more smart, superlative smartest or most smart)

  1. Exhibiting social ability or cleverness.
    Synonyms: bright, capable, sophisticated, witty
    Antonyms: backward, banal, boorish, dull, inept
    • 1811, [Jane Austen], chapter 19, in Sense and Sensibility [], volumes (please specify |volume=I to III), London: [] C[harles] Roworth, [], and published by T[homas] Egerton, [], →OCLC:
      I always preferred the church, and I still do. But that was not smart enough for my family. They recommended the army. That was a great deal too smart for me.
  2. (informal) Exhibiting intellectual knowledge, such as that found in books.
    Synonyms: cultivated, educated, learned; see also Thesaurus:learned
    Antonyms: ignorant, uncultivated, simple
  3. (often in combination) Equipped with intelligent behaviour (digital/computer technology).
    smart car
    smartcard
    smartphone
    • 2018 December 18, Joe Pinsker, “The Coming Commodification of Life at Home”, in The Atlantic[1]:
      “Imagine this,” says an advertising consultant named Barry Lowenthal. “I’m a smart toaster, and I’m collecting data on how many times the toaster is used.”
  4. (Can we verify(+) this sense?) (technology, of human users) Able to see through a false positive of a digital / computer technology equipped with intelligent behavior.
    Sometimes, you are smarter than Microsoft Word's grammar checker, which occasionally flags legitimate sentences as being incorrect.
  5. Good-looking; well dressed; fine; fashionable.
    Synonyms: attractive, chic, dapper, stylish, handsome
    Antonyms: garish, outré, tacky
    a smart outfit
    You look smart in that business suit.
  6. Cleverly shrewd and humorous in a way that may be rude and disrespectful.
    Synonym: silly
    He became tired of his daughter's sarcasm and smart remarks.
    Don't get smart with me!
    • 1728, Edward Young, Satire:
      Who, for the poor renown of being smart / Would leave a sting within a brother's heart?
    • 1711 October 1 (Gregorian calendar), [Joseph Addison; Richard Steele et al.], “THURSDAY, September 20, 1711”, in The Spectator, number 175; republished in Alexander Chalmers, editor, The Spectator; a New Edition, [], volume II, New York, N.Y.: D[aniel] Appleton & Company, 1853, →OCLC:
      I played a sentence or two at my butt, which I thought very smart, when my ill genius, who I verily believed inspired him purely for my destruction, suggested to him such a reply
      The spelling has been modernized.
  7. Sudden and intense.
    • 1702–1704, Edward [Hyde, 1st] Earl of Clarendon, “(please specify |book=I to XVI)”, in The History of the Rebellion and Civil Wars in England, Begun in the Year 1641. [], Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed at the Theater, published 1707, →OCLC:
      smart skirmishes, in which many fell
    • 1860 July 9, Henry David Thoreau, journal entry, from Thoreau's bird-lore, Francis H. Allen (editor), Houghton Mifflin (Boston, 1910), Thoreau on Birds: notes on New England birds from the Journals of Henry David Thoreau, Beacon Press, (Boston, 1993), page 239:
      There is a smart shower at 5 P.M., and in the midst of it a hummingbird is busy about the flowers in the garden, unmindful of it, though you would think that each big drop that struck him would be a serious accident.
  8. Causing sharp pain; stinging.
  9. Sharp; keen; poignant.
    a smart pain
  10. (Southern US, dated) Intense in feeling; painful. Used usually with the adverb intensifier right.
    He raised his voice, and it hurt her feelings right smart.
    That cast on his leg chaffs him right smart.
  11. (archaic) Efficient; vigorous; brilliant.
    • 1697, Virgil, “Georgic 1”, in John Dryden, transl., The Works of Virgil: Containing His Pastorals, Georgics, and Æneis. [], London: [] Jacob Tonson, [], →OCLC:
      The stars shine smarter.
  12. (archaic) Pretentious; showy; spruce.
    a smart gown
  13. (archaic) Brisk; fresh.
    a smart breeze
  14. (Appalachia) Hard-working.
Derived terms edit
Descendants edit
  • Danish: smart
  • German: smart
  • Norwegian:
  • Swedish: smart
Translations edit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 3 edit

From Middle English smerte, from smerten (to smart); see above. Cognate with Scots smert, Dutch smart, Low German smart, German Schmerz, Danish smerte, Swedish smärta. More above.

Noun edit

smart (plural smarts)

  1. A sharp, quick, lively pain; a sting.
  2. Mental pain or suffering; grief; affliction.
  3. Smart-money.
  4. (slang, dated) A dandy; one who is smart in dress; one who is brisk, vivacious, or clever.
Derived terms edit

Anagrams edit

Danish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English smart.

Adjective edit

smart (neuter smart, plural and definite singular attributive smarte, comparative smartere, superlative (predicative) smartest, superlative (attributive) smarteste)

  1. (of a solution, contraption, plan etc.) well thought-out, neat
  2. snazzy, fashionable, dapper

Derived terms edit

Dutch edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Middle Dutch smarte, from Old Dutch *smertan, from Proto-West Germanic *smertan, from Proto-Germanic *smertaną. Cf. German Schmerz, English smart.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

smart f (plural smarten)

  1. pain, sorrow, grief

Usage notes edit

  • Other than in the saying met smart, the word is nowadays considered to be dated.

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

German edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English smart, 19th c.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

smart (strong nominative masculine singular smarter, comparative smarter, superlative am smartesten)

  1. smart (exhibiting social ability or cleverness)
    Synonyms: aufgeweckt, clever, gewitzt, pfiffig
    • 1862, “Amerikanische Zwangsmaßregel”, in Die Gartenlaube[3], number 20, page 320:
      Während in New York und andern östlichen Städten der einfachste kürzeste Proceßgang darin besteht, ist in vielen der westlichen Staaten ein „smarter“ Miether im Stande, fast noch ein Jahr nach geschehener Aufkündigung ein Haus zu bewohnen, ohne nur einen Pfennig Miethe zu zahlen.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 1910, Walther Kabel, Der schlafende Fakir[4]:
      Da vertraute ich mich meinem Chef, Herrn William Hawkens, an, der ein viel zu smarter Geschäftsmann ist, als daß er nicht das nötige Verständnis für diese unter Umständen recht einträgliche Idee gehabt hätte.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
    • 2017, Rechtsanwalt Dr. Thomas M. Grupp, Maître en droit (Aix-Marseille III), “Entwicklungen im Umfeld einer Rechts- und Gerichtsstandswahl in Zeiten von Brexit”, in Europäische Zeitschrift für Wirtschaftsrecht (EuZW)[5], number 24, page 977:
      Die ersichtlichen Bemühungen, einen smarteren Ausstieg aus der EU zu erreichen, decken sich mit den beiden eingangs schon erwähnten Positionspapieren, die von der britischen Regierung im August 2017 zu Themen einer grenzüberschreitenden zivilgerichtlichen Zusammenarbeit und zur Rechtsdurchsetzung und Streitlösung (Dispute Resolution) veröffentlicht worden sind.
      (please add an English translation of this quotation)
  2. smart (good-looking, well-dressed)
    Synonyms: chic, elegant, fein

Declension edit

Further reading edit

  • smart” in Duden online
  • smart” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Maltese edit

Pronunciation edit

Verb edit

smart

  1. first/second-person singular perfect of smar

Middle English edit

Adjective edit

smart

  1. Alternative form of smert

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Etymology edit

From English smart.

Adjective edit

smart (neuter singular smart, definite singular and plural smarte, comparative smartere, indefinite superlative smartest, definite superlative smarteste)

  1. clever (mentally sharp or bright)
  2. smart

Derived terms edit

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology edit

From English smart.

Adjective edit

smart (neuter singular smart, definite singular and plural smarte, comparative smartare, indefinite superlative smartast, definite superlative smartaste)

  1. clever (mentally sharp or bright)
  2. smart

Derived terms edit

References edit

Spanish edit

Adjective edit

smart (invariable)

  1. smart (with smart technology)

Swedish edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from English smart.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

smart (comparative smartare, superlative smartast)

  1. smart; clever
    Antonym: osmart

Declension edit

Inflection of smart
Indefinite Positive Comparative Superlative2
Common singular smart smartare smartast
Neuter singular smart smartare smartast
Plural smarta smartare smartast
Masculine plural3 smarte smartare smartast
Definite Positive Comparative Superlative
Masculine singular1 smarte smartare smartaste
All smarta smartare smartaste
1) Only used, optionally, to refer to things whose natural gender is masculine.
2) The indefinite superlative forms are only used in the predicative.
3) Dated or archaic

Derived terms edit

References edit

Anagrams edit