See also: Saber

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

saber (plural sabers)

  1. (American spelling) Alternative form of sabre

VerbEdit

saber (third-person singular simple present sabers, present participle sabering, simple past and past participle sabered)

  1. (American spelling) Alternative form of sabre

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō (I taste).

VerbEdit

saber

  1. to know

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan saber, from Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō (I taste), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁p- (to try, to research).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

saber (first-person singular present , past participle sabut)

  1. to know (a fact), to have knowledge
  2. to know how to

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

saber m (plural sabers)

  1. knowledge, know-how

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


GalicianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Galician and Old Portuguese saber, from Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō (I taste).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

saber (first-person singular present sei, first-person singular preterite souben, past participle sabido)

  1. to know (a fact)
  2. to know how to do (something)
  3. to find out
  4. (intransitive) to taste, to have a taste
    Sabe ben!It tastes good!
  5. (takes a reflexive pronoun) to like, enjoy
    A min sábeme o caldo.I like broth / I like this broth.
  6. first-person singular personal infinitive of saber
  7. third-person singular personal infinitive of saber

Usage notesEdit

Like Portuguese and Spanish, Galician has two different verbs that are usually translated to English as “to know”. The verb saber relates to factual knowledge and skills. In contrast, the verb coñecer relates to familiarity with people or places.

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

saber m (plural saberes)

  1. knowledge, know-how

ReferencesEdit

  • saber” in Dicionario de Dicionarios do galego medieval, SLI - ILGA 2006-2012.
  • saber” in Xavier Varela Barreiro & Xavier Gómez Guinovart: Corpus Xelmírez - Corpus lingüístico da Galicia medieval. SLI / Grupo TALG / ILG, 2006-2016.
  • saber” in Dicionario de Dicionarios da lingua galega, SLI - ILGA 2006-2013.
  • saber” in Tesouro informatizado da lingua galega. Santiago: ILG.
  • saber” in Álvarez, Rosario (coord.): Tesouro do léxico patrimonial galego e portugués, Santiago de Compostela: Instituto da Lingua Galega.

OccitanEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Occitan saber, from Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō (I taste).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

saber

  1. to know
    Antonym: ignorar

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit


Old OccitanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō (I taste).

VerbEdit

saber

  1. to taste (have a certain taste)
  2. to know

NounEdit

saber m (oblique plural sabers, nominative singular sabers, nominative plural saber)

  1. knowledge

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Catalan: saber
  • Occitan: saber

ReferencesEdit


PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Portuguese saber, from Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō (I taste; I am wise), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁p- (to try, to research).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

saber (first-person singular present indicative sei, past participle sabido)

  1. to know
    1. (intransitive) to be aware of a fact
      Perguntaram-me a resposta, mas eu não sabia.
      They asked me the answer, but I didn’t know.
      Sei que é verdade.
      I know it’s true.
    2. (transitive) to be aware of a value or piece of information
      Eu sei qual é a capital da Assíria.
      I know what is the capital of Assyria.
      Ele sabe duzentos algarismos do número neperiano.
      He knows two hundred digits of Euler’s number.
      Ninguém sabe qual é a velocidade aérea média de uma andorinha não carregada.
      Nobody knows what the average airspeed velocity of an unladen swallow is.
    3. (auxiliary with a verb in the impersonal infinitive) to know how to do something
      Não sei fazer isso, mas ela sabe.
      I don’t know how to do this, but she knows.
      Sabes falar russo?
      Do you know how to speak Russian?
  2. (transitive with de or sobre) to know about; to have heard about
    Soube da explosão que houve no centro?
    Have you heard about the downtown explosion?
  3. (Portugal) (transitive with a) to taste of (to have the same taste as)
    Um bom vinho sabe a carvalho.
    A good wine tastes like oak.
  4. (Portugal) to have a pleasant taste
    Como sabe esse vinho!
    How good does this wine taste!

ConjugationEdit

QuotationsEdit

For quotations of use of this term, see Citations:saber.

Usage notesEdit

saber does not mean to know in the sense of knowing someone (who they are); for that, conhecer should be used instead.

SynonymsEdit

DescendantsEdit

NounEdit

saber m (plural saberes)

  1. knowledge; lore (intellectual understanding)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin *sapēre, from Latin sapere, present active infinitive of sapiō (I taste), from Proto-Indo-European *seh₁p- (to try, to research). Compare English savvy and savor.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /saˈbeɾ/, [saˈβeɾ]

VerbEdit

saber (first-person singular present , first-person singular preterite supe, past participle sabido)

  1. to know (a fact)
    que volverá.I know it'll come back.
    Lo siguiente que ...Next thing I know...
  2. to know how to do something
    Sabe hablar español.He knows how to speak Spanish.
  3. (in the preterite tense) to find out, to learn
  4. to taste
    Sabe a pollo.It tastes like chicken.
  5. to realize, to know (e.g. recognize)
    El hombre no sabe lo talentoso que su hijo es.The man doesn't realize how talented his son is.
  6. to tell, to know (i.e. to discern or distinguish if something is the case)
    Siempre es difícil saber si me mientes.It's always hard to tell if you're lying to me.
  7. (informal) to figure out
    Todavía estamos tratando de saber qué acaba de pasar.We're still trying to figure out what just happened.
  8. to hear from (+ de)
    No he sabido nada de ella en meses.I haven't heard from her in months.
  9. to hear of, to hear about, (+ de)
  10. to learn of, to learn about, to find out about, to know about (+ de)
  11. (reflexive) to be known
    Ya se sabe que uno de los factores que aceleran esta enfermedad es el estrés.
    It is known that one of the factors that speeds up this disease is stress.
  12. (reflexive) to know (extremely well)
    He oído que te sabes todas las líneas de la película de memoria.
    I heard you know all the lines of the movie by heart.

ConjugationEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

NounEdit

saber m (plural saberes)

  1. knowledge

See alsoEdit