EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

 
A modern style of sconce.
 
An older style of sconce.

From Middle English sconce, skonce, sconse, from Old French esconce (lantern), from Latin absconsus (hidden), perfect passive participle of abscondō (hide).[1][2] Cognate with abscond.

NounEdit

sconce (plural sconces)

  1. A fixture for a light.
  2. A head or a skull.
    • c. 1599-1602, William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act V, scene 1:
      Why does he suffer this rude knave now, to knock him about the sconce with a dirty shovel, and will not tell him of his action of battery?
    • 1818, John Keats, On Some Skulls in Beauly Abbey, near Inverness:
      Long time this sconce a helmet wore,
      But sickness smites the conscience sore;
      He broke his sword, and hither bore
      His gear and plunder,
      Took to the cowl,—then rav’d and swore
      At his damn’d blunder!
  3. A poll tax; a mulct or fine.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
  4. A piece of armor for the head; headpiece; helmet.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

sconce (third-person singular simple present sconces, present participle sconcing, simple past and past participle sconced)

  1. (obsolete) to impose a fine, a forfeit, or a mulct.
    (The addition of quotations indicative of this usage is being sought:)

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from Middle Dutch schans, cognate with German Schanze.[2]

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

sconce (plural sconces)

  1. A type of small fort or other fortification, especially as built to defend a pass or ford.
  2. (obsolete) A hut for protection and shelter; a stall.
  3. The circular tube, with a brim, in a candlestick, into which the candle is inserted.
  4. (architecture) A squinch.
  5. A fragment of a floe of ice.
    • 1856, Elisha Kent Kane, Arctic Explorations
      Just then, a broad sconce-piece or low water-washed berg came driving up from the southward. The thought flashed upon me of one of our escapes in Melville Bay; and as the sconce moved rapidly close alongside us, McGary managed to plant an anchor on its slope and hold on to it by a whale-line.
  6. A fixed seat or shelf.
Derived termsEdit

VerbEdit

sconce (third-person singular simple present sconces, present participle sconcing, simple past and past participle sconced)

  1. (obsolete) to shut within a sconce; to imprison.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
  2. 2.0 2.1 ensconce The Lexiteria & alphaDictionary

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈskon.t͡ʃe/
  • Hyphenation: scón‧ce

AdjectiveEdit

sconce

  1. feminine plural of sconcio