See also: Fort, fört, fòrt, fořt, for't, and fort-

English edit

 Fort (disambiguation) on Wikipedia

Etymology edit

From Middle English fort, from Middle French fort (strong) (adjective use is from Old French). Doublet of fortis and forte.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fort (plural forts)

  1. A fortified defensive structure stationed with troops.
  2. Any permanent army post.
  3. (historical) An outlying trading-station, as in British North America.
  4. A structure improvised from furniture, bedding, etc., for playing games.
    Synonym: den
    The kids built a fort out of chairs and pillows.

Synonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Sranan Tongo: foto

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Verb edit

fort (third-person singular simple present forts, present participle forting, simple past and past participle forted)

  1. To create a fort, fortifications, a strong point, or a redoubt.

Anagrams edit

Catalan edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Latin fortem (strong), from Old Latin forctis, fortis, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (to rise, high, hill).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fort (feminine forta, masculine plural forts, feminine plural fortes)

  1. strong (forceful, powerful)
    Antonyms: feble, dèbil
  2. strong (durable, resistant)
  3. strong (potent, having a high degree of intensity)

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Adverb edit

fort

  1. strongly

Noun edit

fort m (plural forts, feminine forta)

  1. a strong person
  2. strength (the strongest part of something)
  3. a fort or other defensive construction

Interjection edit

fort

  1. expresses approval of a punishment or misfortune suffered by another

Further reading edit

Danish edit

Noun edit

fort n (singular definite fortet, plural indefinite forter)

  1. fort

References edit

Dutch edit

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fort n (plural forten, diminutive fortje n)

  1. castle
  2. fort

Descendants edit

Anagrams edit

French edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Old French fort, from Latin fortem (strong), from Old Latin forctis, fortis, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ- (to rise, high, hill).

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fort (feminine forte, masculine plural forts, feminine plural fortes)

  1. strong; powerful
    Arnie est fort.Arnie is strong.
    hommes fortsstrong men
  2. (transitive with en) (informal) skilled, proficient, successful, sometimes translated "good" (often used in reference to academic subjects)
    Je suis fort en anglaisI am good at English
  3. (transitive with de) who can count on
    fort d’une solide expériencebased on solid experience

Synonyms edit

Antonyms edit

Derived terms edit

Adverb edit

fort

  1. strongly
  2. much, a lot
    • 2001, Le Funambule, →ISBN, page 141:
      Alors on ferme les yeux, on a fort envie de quelque chose et on se l’offre.
      So we close our eyes, we really fancy something and we're going to take it.
  3. (when preceding certain adjectives and adverbs) very (intensifier)
    Je lui parle fort souvent.I speak with her very often.

Usage notes edit

  • As an intensifying adverb in the sense of very, fort is synonymous but not always interchangeable with très and the similarly limited bien.

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Noun edit

fort m (plural forts)

  1. a fort

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Further reading edit

German edit

Etymology edit

From Middle High German vort, Old High German forth, Proto-Germanic *furþą, compare English forth, Dutch voort.

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

fort

  1. away
  2. gone
  3. going on, continuing

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • fort” in Duden online
  • fort” in Digitales Wörterbuch der deutschen Sprache

Lombard edit

Etymology edit

Akin to Italian forte and French fort, from Latin fortis.

Adjective edit

fort

  1. strong

Middle French edit

Etymology edit

From Old French fort.

Adjective edit

fort m (feminine singular forte, masculine plural fors, feminine plural fortes)

  1. strong

Descendants edit

Norman edit

Etymology edit

From Old French fort, from Latin fortis, from Proto-Indo-European *bʰerǵʰ-.

Adjective edit

fort m

  1. strong

Derived terms edit

Noun edit

fort m (plural forts)

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey, military, etc.) fort

Norwegian Bokmål edit

Pronunciation edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Low German vort.

Adverb edit

fort (comparative fortere, superlative fortest)

  1. fast, quick (adverb), quickly

Etymology 2 edit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

From French fort.

Noun edit

fort n (definite singular fortet, indefinite plural fort or forter, definite plural forta or fortene)

  1. (military) a fort

References edit

Norwegian Nynorsk edit

Etymology 1 edit

From Middle Low German vort.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fort (indefinite singular fort, definite singular and plural forte, comparative fortare, indefinite superlative fortast, definite superlative fortaste)

  1. quick
Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit

Adverb edit

fort

  1. quickly
Synonyms edit
Antonyms edit

Etymology 2 edit

From French fort.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fort n (definite singular fortet, indefinite plural fort, definite plural forta)

  1. fortress
Derived terms edit

References edit

Old Dutch edit

Adverb edit

fort

  1. away

References edit

Old French edit

Etymology edit

From Latin fortis.

Pronunciation edit

Adjective edit

fort m (oblique and nominative feminine singular fort or forte)

  1. strong
    • late 12th century, anonymous author, “La Folie de Tristan d'Oxford”, in Le Roman de Tristan, Champion Classiques edition, →ISBN, page 354, lines 67–70:
      La nef ert fort e belle e grande,
      bone cum cele k'ert markande.
      De plusurs mers chargee esteit,
      en Engleterre curre devait.
      The ship was strong and beautiful and big,
      good like a merchant's ship
      loaded with lots of different type of merchandise
      ready to set sail to England.

Declension edit

Adverb edit

fort

  1. strongly

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

Old Irish edit

Pronoun edit

fort

  1. second-person singular of for
    on you

Descendants edit

Polish edit

 
fort

Etymology edit

Ultimately from Latin fortis.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fort m inan

  1. fortress (fortified place)
    Synonyms: barbakan, koszary, twierdza

Declension edit

Related terms edit

Further reading edit

  • fort in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • fort in Polish dictionaries at PWN

Romanian edit

Etymology edit

Borrowed from French fort.

Noun edit

fort n (plural forturi)

  1. fort, fortification

Declension edit

Swedish edit

Etymology 1 edit

Attested since 1609 according to Nationalencyklopedins Ordbok, from Middle Low German fôrt (away, further, forward), which is used adverbially (forts) with the same meaning in Low German. Related to för (fore), före (before) and forsla (transport, carry, haul).

Pronunciation edit

Adverb edit

fort (comparative fortare, superlative fortast)

  1. quickly/quick, fast
    Synonym: snabbt
Related terms edit

Etymology 2 edit

Attested since 1651 according to Nationalencyklopedins Ordbok. From French fort.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

fort n

  1. a fort
Usage notes edit
  • Permanent (stone) fortifications in Europe are called fästning, while fort (and skans) is used for less permanent (earth and wood) structures and for forts in America.
Declension edit
Declension of fort 
Singular Plural
Indefinite Definite Indefinite Definite
Nominative fort fortet fort forten
Genitive forts fortets forts fortens
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References edit