See also: sept- and Sept.

Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

A corruption of sect, influenced by Latin saeptum(fence, enclosure).

NounEdit

sept ‎(plural septs)

  1. A clan, tribe, or family, proceeding from a common progenitor (used especially of the ancient clans in Ireland).
    • 1842, Samuel Lover, Handy Andy[1], volume 2:
      The chief, struck by the illustration, asked at once to be baptized, and all his sept followed his example.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Probably influenced by weepwept.

VerbEdit

sept

  1. (nonstandard, rare) simple past tense and past participle of seep

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French sept, from Old French set, from Latin septem(seven), from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥.

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

French cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : sept
    Ordinal : septième
French Wikipedia article on sept

sept

  1. seven

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Playing cards in French · cartes à jouer (layout · text)
             
as deux trois quatre cinq six sept
             
huit neuf dix valet dame roi joker

AnagramsEdit

External linksEdit


Middle FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French set.

NumeralEdit

sept ‎(invariable)

  1. seven

DescendantsEdit


NormanEdit

Norman cardinal numbers
 <  6 7 8  > 
    Cardinal : sept

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin septem, from Proto-Indo-European *septḿ̥.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NumeralEdit

sept

  1. (Jersey) seven

Derived termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French septum, Borrowing from Latin saeptum.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sept n ‎(plural septuri)

  1. (anatomy) septum

DeclensionEdit