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See also: Carte and carté

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French carte, from Latin charta. See card, chart.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

carte (plural cartes)

  1. A bill of fare; a menu.
  2. (dated) A visiting card.
    • 1869, Emma Jane Worboise, The fortunes of Cyril Denham (page 258)
      "He only says she is Laura Somerset, and he sends me her carte; here it is."
  3. (Scotland, dated) A playing card.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for carte in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin charta, from Ancient Greek χάρτης (khártēs). Cognate with French charte.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

carte f (plural cartes)

  1. card
  2. chart; map
  3. menu

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

carte f pl

  1. plural of carta

AnagramsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin charta (probably borrowed), from Ancient Greek χάρτης (khártēs, papyrus, paper).

NounEdit

carte f (plural cartes)

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) card
  2. (Jersey, nautical) chart

Derived termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

NounEdit

carte f (oblique plural cartes, nominative singular carte, nominative plural cartes)

  1. Alternative form of chartre

RomanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Inherited from Latin charta, possibly through a hypothetical earlier Romanian intermediate form *cartă, and created from its plural (thus deriving its meaning from "many papers"). Ultimately from Ancient Greek χάρτης (khártēs). Doublet of cartă, a borrowing.

NounEdit

carte f (plural cărți)

  1. book
  2. card
DeclensionEdit
Related termsEdit
See alsoEdit

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

carte f pl

  1. plural of cartă