See also: Six and sîx

Translingual edit

 
Signal flag for the digit 6

Etymology edit

From English six.

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

six

  1. (international standards) NATO & ICAO radiotelephony clear code (spelling-alphabet name) for the digit 6.
    Synonym: soxisix (ITU/IMO)

References edit

  1. ^ Annex 10 to the Convention on International Civil Aviation: Aeronautical Telecommunications; Volume II Communication Procedures including those with PANS status[1], 6th edition, International Civil Aviation Organization, October 2001, retrieved 23 January 2019, page §5.2.1.4.3.1

English edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia
English numbers (edit)
60
 ←  5 6 7  → 
    Cardinal: six
    Ordinal: sixth
    Latinate ordinal: senary
    Adverbial: six times
    Multiplier: sixfold
    Latinate multiplier: sextuple
    Distributive: sextuply
    Group collective: half-dozen, sixsome
    Multipart collective: sextuplet, hextuplet
    Greek or Latinate collective: hexad
    Greek collective prefix: hexa-
    Latinate collective prefix: sexa-
    Fractional: sixth
    Latinate fractional prefix: sextant-
    Elemental: sextuplet, hextuplet
    Greek prefix: ecto-
    Number of musicians: sextet
    Number of years: sexennium

Etymology edit

From Middle English six, from Old English six, from Proto-West Germanic *sehs, from Proto-Germanic *sehs, from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs. Compare West Frisian seis, Dutch zes, Low German söss, sess, German sechs, Norwegian and Danish seks, also Latin sex, Ancient Greek ἕξ (héx), Sanskrit षष् (ṣaṣ). Doublet of sice. Toilet sense predates military usage.[1]

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

six

  1. A numerical value equal to 6; the number following five and preceding seven. This many dots: (••••••).

Derived terms edit

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Sranan Tongo: siksi
  • Saramaccan: sigisi

Translations edit

Noun edit

six (plural sixes)

  1. A group or set with six elements.
  2. The digit or figure 6.
  3. Six o'clock.
    • 1838, Francis Bisset Hawkins, chapter XIII, in Germany: The Spirit of Her History, Literature, Social Condition and National Economy, Illustrated by Reference to Her Physical, Moral and Political Statistics, etc.[2], →OCLC, page 228:
      In Austria the prisoners rise at five, [...]. There are morning prayers at a quarter to six, after which the prisoners are conducted to work.
  4. (military slang, by ellipsis of six o'clock) Rear, behind (rear side of something).
    cover my six
    • 2009, Bill Yenne, Aces High: The Heroic Saga of the Two Top-scoring American Aces of World War II, Penguin, →ISBN, page 98:
      Just as having an enemy on your “six” is the hardest situation to escape, being on an enemy at six o'clock is the surest kill. Fighter pilots are always practicing maneuvers to get out from having another aircraft on their six.
  5. (cricket, countable) An event whereby a batsman hits a ball which does not bounce before passing over a boundary in the air, resulting in an award of 6 runs for the batting team.
    • 2019 July 14, Stephan Shemilt, “England win Cricket World Cup: Ben Stokes stars in dramatic finale against New Zealand”, in BBC Sport[3], London:
      England required 15 from the last over of the regular match. Ben Stokes hit a six and benefited when a throw from the deep hit him and went for four overthrows.
  6. (American football) A touchdown.
  7. (North Wales) A bathroom or toilet.
  8. (obsolete) Small beer sold at six shillings per barrel.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

See also edit

Playing cards in English · playing cards (layout · text)
             
ace deuce, two three four five six seven
             
eight nine ten jack, knave queen king joker

References edit

Anagrams edit

French edit

French numbers (edit)
60
 ←  5 6 7  → 
    Cardinal: six
    Ordinal: sixième
    Ordinal abbreviation: 6e, (now nonstandard) 6ème
    Multiplier: sextuple

Etymology edit

Inherited from Middle French six, from Old French sis, six, from Latin sex, from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs.

The numbers six and dix (ten), as well as the pronoun tous (all), are remnants of the Old and Middle French pronunciation system where final -s or -x was silent before consonants, pronounced /z/ before vowels, and /s/ in pausa. The only change is that the pausal pronunciation is now invariably used when these words do not precede their referent.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /sis/ (independent)
    • (file)
    • (file)
  • IPA(key): /si.z‿/ (before modified word in a vowel or mute h)
  • IPA(key): /si/ (before modified word in a consonant or aspirate h)
  • Rhymes: -is

Numeral edit

six (invariable)

  1. six

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit

  • Haitian Creole: sis
  • Louisiana Creole: sis
  • Mauritian Creole: sis

See also edit

Playing cards in French · cartes à jouer (layout · text)
             
as deux trois quatre cinq six sept
             
huit neuf dix valet dame roi joker

Further reading edit

Maonan edit

Numeral edit

six

  1. four

Middle English edit

Middle English numbers (edit)
60
 ←  5 6 7  → 
    Cardinal: six
    Ordinal: sixte

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Old English six, from Proto-West Germanic *sehs, from Proto-Germanic *sehs, from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

six

  1. six

Related terms edit

Descendants edit

References edit

Middle French edit

Etymology edit

From Old French sis, six.

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): (in isolation) /sis/, (before a vowel) /siz/, (before a consonant) /si/

Numeral edit

six (invariable)

  1. six

Descendants edit

  • French: six
    • Haitian Creole: sis
    • Louisiana Creole: sis
    • Mauritian Creole: sis
  • Norman: six

Norman edit

Norman cardinal numbers
 <  5 6 7  > 
    Cardinal : six
Norman cardinal numbers
 <  5 6 7  > 
    Cardinal : six

Etymology edit

From Latin sex, from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs.

Pronunciation edit

  • (file)

Numeral edit

six

  1. (Jersey, Guernsey) six

Old English edit

Old English numbers (edit)
60
 ←  5 6 7  → 
    Cardinal: six
    Ordinal: sixta
    Multiplier: sixfeald

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

Inherited from Proto-West Germanic *sehs, from Proto-Germanic *sehs, from Proto-Indo-European *swéḱs.

Pronunciation edit

Numeral edit

six

  1. six

Derived terms edit

Descendants edit