Open main menu
See also: Sharrow

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
Sharrow (lower right)

EtymologyEdit

Blend of share +‎ arrow, c. 2004, US, following earlier shared lane marking (c. 1993, Denver). Coined by Oliver Gajda, of the City and County of San Francisco Bicycle Program.[1] Compare Feb 2004 report, which uses shared lane marking,[2] and meetings of Jul 2004 meeting, which uses sharrow.[3]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sharrow (plural sharrows)

  1. a shared lane marking on a lane of a paved road's surface indicating that bicyclists may use any portion of the full width of the lane.
    • 2004 March 27, Pein, Wayne, “Re: LAB?”, in rec.bicycles.misc, Usenet[3], retrieved 2018-06-14, message-ID <4065D06D.ABC65A8A@nc.rr.com>:
      If you are referring to the http://www.humantransport.org/bicycledriving/index.html website, I don't believe we have a picture of what has been called the "Sharrow," the Shared-Use Arrow. ... Some of us on another list are in discussion about the Sharrow. Our conclusion seems to be that it is preferable to bike lanes, but should be laterally located in the center of the lane so as to NOT mis-communicate to either party expected bicyclist lateral location.
    • 2004 July 21, SAN FRANCISCO BICYCLE ADVISORY COMMITTEE (BAC), “Regular Meeting Minutes”, in City and County of San Francisco[4], archived from the original on 2018-06-14:
      As to the SHARROW Study (E1) Mr. Gajda reminded the BAC that colors have to be approved along with everything else and without CTCDC approval the City would be legally exposed. The BAC has the opportunity to advise the Board of Supervisors of our preferences and the Board can then inform the DPT. After being asked of how SHARROW placement decisions are made Mr. Gajda responded that the first work is done on bike routes that do not have a bike lane. Class three roadways. Volumes, speeds, width, collisions, especially dooring. Mr. Gajda warned that the date is based on citations in collision data base which leaves out all unreported accidents. After being asked about what items in the report DPT recommends action by the BAC Mr. Gajda responded that BAC take action on Policy, Grants, and Funding Legislation. Jerry Ervin(District 8) requested a specific list of where the BAC could expect requests for action from DPT. Mr. Gajda responded: SHARROW, Howard Street, Folsom Street, Octavia, Street Surface Conditions, Bicycle Parking, Baby Bullets, BART Bike Station, Funding.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ San Francisco Bay Bikers blog entry on San Francisco Chronicle site
  2. ^ “San Francisco's Shared Lane Pavement Markings: Improving Bicycle Safety, February 2004”, in (Please provide the title of the work)[1], accessed 22 July 2014, archived from the original on 9 May 2012
  3. ^ “San Francisco Bicycle Advisory Committee (BAC): Regular Meeting Minutes, Wednesday, July 21, 2004”, in (Please provide the title of the work)[2], accessed 22 July 2014, archived from the original on 6 February 2014

AnagramsEdit