English edit

 
Half shekel dated 68/9 CE

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Hebrew שֶׁקֶל (shékel, shekel), from שָׁקַל (shakál, to weigh), from Akkadian 𒂅 (šiqlum).

Pronunciation edit

  • IPA(key): /ˈʃɛkəl/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɛkəl
  • Hyphenation: shek‧el

Noun edit

shekel (plural shekels or shekalim)

  1. A currency unit of both ancient and modern Israel.
  2. (slang) Money.
    • 1914, The Judge, volume 66:
      Her gownlet cost five hundred beans; / Her furs, four figures in a row; / Her hat removed from papa's jeans / A hundred shekels more or so.
    • 1924, James Alban Wilson, Sport and Service in Assam and Elsewhere, page 288:
      [] after the 1887-9 campaign was the great refuge of the destitute who, as they could not hope to rake in a breast-full of medals and decorations, expected, at any rate, to amass a good few shekels.
    • 2018, Gerry Woodhouse, Lord Damnus: Conqueror of the World:
      The mob had filched anything that might earn them a shekel or two.
  3. (historical) An ancient unit of weight equivalent to one-fiftieth of a mina.

Derived terms edit

Translations edit

See also edit

Further reading edit

French edit

Alternative forms edit

Etymology edit

From Hebrew שֶׁקֶל (shékel, shekel), from שָׁקַל (shakál, to weigh).

Pronunciation edit

Noun edit

shekel m (plural shekels)

  1. shekel (unit of currency)

Portuguese edit

Noun edit

shekel m (plural shekels)

  1. sheqel (currency unit in Israel)