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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin sinciput (half a head”; “smoked hog’s cheek or half-jowl”; (transferred senses): “brain”, “head), whence the French sinciput.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sinciput (plural sincipita or sinciputs)

  1. (chiefly anatomy) The front part of the head or skull (as contradistinct from occiput).
    Synonym: bregma
    Antonym: occiput
    • 1964, International Abstracts of Surgery, Volume 119, page 629,
      The cranial anomalies occurred either in the occiput or the sinciput, approximately twice as often in the occiput as in the sinciput.
      Such lesions have been considered to be inoperable when they involved the sinciput.
    • 1997, Robert K. Creasy, Management of Labor and Delivery, page 375,
      Between these two extremes lie the sinciput presentation and the brow presentation. Thus there are four distinct attitudes: vertex, sinciput, brow, and face (Figure 15-7).
    • 2003, Sara Wickham, Midwifery: Best Practice, Volume 1, page 79,
      I learnt to develop a ‘feel’ for the sinciput and the occiput as these landmarks feel different abdominally, and also their ‘whereabouts’ in relationship to the pelvic brim. Therefore, when descent and flexion were taking place, I learnt to ascertain how the positions of the sinciput and occiput would change in relationship to each other and in relationship to the pelvic brim.

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin sinciput (half a head”; “smoked hog’s cheek or half-jowl”; (transferred senses): “brain”, “head), whence English sinciput.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sinciput m (plural sinciputs)

  1. (anatomy) sinciput
    Antonym: occiput

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

sēmi- (half) +‎ caput (head); compare Ancient Greek ἡμικεφάλιον (hēmikephálion), ἡμίκρανον (hēmíkranon), ἡμικέφαλον (hēmiképhalon)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sinciput n (genitive sincipitis); third declension

  1. half a head; hence, a cheek or half the jowl of a smoked hog
    • c. 77 CE – 79 CE, Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia 8.209:
      Neque aliō ex animālī numerōsior māteria gāneae: quīnquāgintā prope sapōrēs, eum cēterīs singulī. Hinc cēnsōriārum legum pāginae, interdictaque cēnīs abdomina, glandia, testiculī, vulvae, sincipita verrīna, ut tamen Pūblī mīmōrum poetae cēna postquam servitutem exuerat nūlla memorētur sine abdomine, etiam vocābulō sūminis ab eō inpositō.
      Nor is more numerous eating matter derived from any other animal: almost fifty flavours, while the other animals only have one. Hence the pages of sumptuary laws, and hog's paunches, sweetbreads, testicles, matrix and hog cheeks forbidden from feasts, although no dinner of Publius the mime-writer after being freed from slavery is recorded to have been without paunch, even with the nickname 'Udder' given to him for this.
  2. (transferred senses):
    1. the brain
      • c. 200 BCE, Plautus, Menaechmi 3.2.38–40:
        PĒNICULUS. Nōn mē nōvistī? MENAECHMUS SŌSICLĒS. Nōn negem, sī nōverim.
        PĒNICULUS. Tuom parasītum nōn nōvistī? MENAECHMUS SŌSICLĒS. Nōn tibī
        sānum est, adulēscēns, sinciput, intellegō.
        PENICULUS. You don't recognize me? MAENACHMUS SOSICLES. I wouldn't deny it, if I recognized you.
        PENICULUS. You don't recognize your parasite? MAENACHMUS SOSICLES. You aren't
        right in the brain, young one, I understand.
    2. (loosely) the head

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative sinciput sincipita
Genitive sincipitis sincipitum
Dative sincipitī sincipitibus
Accusative sinciput sincipita
Ablative sincipite sincipitibus
Vocative sinciput sincipita

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: sinciput
  • French: sinciput
  • Portuguese: sinciput

ReferencesEdit