See also: hög and høg

EnglishEdit

 
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Alternative formsEdit

  • (UK, dialectal) 'og

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English hog, from Old English hogg, hocg (hog), possibly from Old Norse hǫggva (to strike, chop, cut), from Proto-Germanic *hawwaną (to hew, forge), from Proto-Indo-European *kewh₂- (to beat, hew, forge). Cognate with Old High German houwan, Old Saxon hauwan, Old English hēawan (English hew). Hog originally meant a castrated male pig, hence a sense of “the cut one”. (Compare hogget for a castrated male sheep.) More at hew. Alternatively from a Brythonic language, from Proto-Celtic *sukkos, from Proto-Indo-European *suH- and thus cognate with Welsh hwch (sow) and Cornish hogh (pig).

NounEdit

hog (plural hogs)

  1. Any animal belonging to the Suidae family of mammals, especially the pig, the warthog, and the boar.
  2. (specifically) An adult swine (contrasted with a pig, a young swine).
    • 2005 April, Live Swine from Canada, Investigation No. 731-TA-1076 (Final), publication 3766, April 2005, U.S. International Trade Commission →ISBN, page I-9:
      Weanlings grow into feeder pigs, and feeder pigs grow into slaughter hogs. [] Ultimately the end use for virtually all pigs and hogs is to be slaughtered for the production of pork and other products.
  3. A greedy person or thing; one who refuses to share.
    Since the latest upgrade, this program has turned into a CPU hog.
  4. (slang) A large motorcycle, particularly a Harley-Davidson.
  5. (Britain) A young sheep that has not been shorn.
  6. (nautical) A rough, flat scrubbing broom for scrubbing a ship's bottom under water.
    • 1813, John Mason Good, Olinthus Gilbert Gregory, and Newton Bosworth, Pantologia. A new (cabinet) cyclopædia, volume 5, T. Davison, Lombard street, Whitefriars, page 11:
      Hog, on board a ship, is a sort of flat scrubbing-broom, formed by inclosing a number of short twigs of birch or such wood between two pieces of plank fastened together, and cutting off the ends of the twigs. It is used to scrape the filth from a ship's bottom under water, particularly in the act of boot-topping. For this purpose they fit to this broom a long staff with two ropes; one of which is used to thrust the hog under the ship's bottom, and the other to guide and pull it up again close to the planks.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Totten to this entry?)
  7. A device for mixing and stirring the pulp from which paper is made.
  8. (Britain, historical, archaic slang, countable and uncountable) A shilling coin; its value, 12 old pence.
  9. (Britain, historical, obsolete slang, countable and uncountable) A tanner, a sixpence coin; its value.
    • 1961, Eric Partridge, The Routledge Dictionary of Historical Slang:
      hog (pl hog)... 2. In C.18–early 19, occ. a sixpence: also c., whence the U.S. sense. Prob. ex the figure of a hog on a small silver coin.
  10. (Britain, historical, obsolete slang, countable and uncountable) A half-crown coin; its value, 30 old pence.
    • 1961, Eric Partridge, The Routledge Dictionary of Historical Slang:
      hog (pl hog)... 3. A half-crown: ca 1860–1910.
  11. (nautical) the effect of the middle of the hull of a ship rising while the ends droop
    • 1920, The Records of the Proceedings and the Printed Papers, Parliamentary paper:
      I would not consider a ship unseaworthy because she had a hog. There is no danger to life in sailing in a hogged ship. I have sailed in vessels having a 2-ft. hog in the keel. The keel has been straightened by being filled in underneath.
    • 2007, Charles E. Brodine, Michael J. Crawford, Christine F. Hughes, Interpreting Old Ironsides: An Illustrated Guide to USS Constitution, Government Printing Office, →ISBN, page 84:
      On inspection it was found that the vessel's keel had a hog of nearly fourteen inches.
HyponymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

hog (third-person singular simple present hogs, present participle hogging, simple past and past participle hogged)

  1. (transitive) To greedily take more than one's share, to take precedence at the expense of another or others.
    • 2000 DiCamillo, Kate Because of Winn-Dixie, Scholastic Inc., New York, Ch 15:
      The [...] air-conditioning unit didn't work very good, and there was only one fan; and from the minute me and Winn-Dixie got in the library, he hogged it all.
    Hey! Quit hogging all the blankets.
  2. (transitive) To clip the mane of a horse, making it short and bristly.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Smart to this entry?)
  3. (nautical) To scrub with a hog, or scrubbing broom.
  4. (transitive, nautical) To cause the keel of a ship to arch upwards (the opposite of sag).
    • 1991, J. E. Gordon, Structures: Or Why Things Don't Fall Down, Penguin UK, →ISBN, page 52:
      Although most of the buoyancy of a ship is provided by the middle part of the hull and comparatively little by the tapering ends, nothing will ever prevent people from putting heavy weights into the ends of a ship. One result of this is that many vessels tend to 'hog' (the two ends tend to droop and the middle of the hull tends to rise).
    • 2013, H. I. Lavery, Shipboard Operations, Routledge, →ISBN, page 267:
      Difficulty may be encountered when securing cargo hatches on ships which hog or sag and the water-tight integrity of the ship may be impaired.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

hog (third-person singular simple present hogs, present participle hogging, simple past and past participle hogged)

  1. (transitive) To process (bark, etc.) into hog fuel.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Clipping of quahog

NounEdit

hog (plural hogs)

  1. (informal) A quahog (clam)

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English hogg, hocg; further etymology is disputed.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hog (plural hogges, genitive hogges)

  1. A pig or swine, especially one that is castrated and male.
  2. The meat of swine or pigs.
  3. A hogget or young sheep.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: hog
  • Scots: hog, hogue

ReferencesEdit


VolapükEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hog (nominative plural hogs)

  1. hole

DeclensionEdit