See also: Sirup

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English sirup, from Anglo-French sirop, from Medieval Latin siruppus, syrupus, from Arabic شَرَاب(šarāb, a drink, wine, coffee, syrup). Compare French sirop, Italian siroppo, Spanish jarabe, jarope. Compare also sherbet.

The first known use of sirup was in the 14th century.

NounEdit

sirup (countable and uncountable, plural sirups)

  1. Obsolete form of syrup.

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

sirup m

  1. syrup (liquid)

DeclensionEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Old Norse sirop, from Latin siropus, from Arabic شَرَاب(šarāb)

NounEdit

sirup c (singular definite siruppen, plural indefinite sirupper)

  1. syrup

ReferencesEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French sirop, from Medieval Latin siruppus, syrupus, from Arabic شَرَاب(šarāb).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈsirup/, /ˈsirip/

NounEdit

sirup (plural sirupes)

  1. (medicine) A syrup of herbs used for medicine.
  2. (cooking) A watery sauce based around wine.

DescendantsEdit

  • English: syrup
  • Scots: seerup

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sirop and Latin siropus

NounEdit

sirup m (definite singular sirupen, indefinite plural siruper, definite plural sirupene)

  1. syrup

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse sirop and Latin siropus

NounEdit

sirup m (definite singular sirupen, indefinite plural sirupar, definite plural sirupane)

  1. syrup

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /sǐrup/
  • Hyphenation: si‧rup

NounEdit

sìrup m (Cyrillic spelling сѝруп)

  1. syrup

DeclensionEdit