Contents

EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

slinks

  1. third-person singular simple present indicative form of slink

LatvianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a (still dialectally attested) verb slinkt(to creep, to crawl, to go slowly) (compare Lithuanian sliñkti(to crawl slowly)), from Proto-Baltic *slink-, from a reduced grade of Proto-Indo-European *slenk-(to turn, to twist, to wind; to drag oneself, to creep, to crawl) (perhaps in confluence with Proto-Indo-European *(s)lēg-, *(s)leg-(to be languid)). The meaning went from “to crawl, to creep” to “to move slowly, lazily,” “to be lazy,” or, for the adjective slinks, from “slow-moving” to “lazy.” Cognates include Lithuanian sliñkas.[1]

PronunciationEdit

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AdjectiveEdit

slinks (def. slinkais, comp. slinkāks, sup. visslinkākais; adv. slinki)

  1. lazy (who is given to idleness, who typically does not like, is reluctant to work, to do something)
    slinks darbinieks, talcinieks‎ ― lazy employee, helper
    slinks strādnieks, skolnieks‎ ― lazy worker, schoolchild
    slinks zirgs‎ ― lazy horse

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Karulis, Konstantīns (1992), “slinks”, in Latviešu Etimoloģijas Vārdnīca (in Latvian), Rīga: AVOTS, ISBN 9984-700-12-7