EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Scots snoot, snout (snout), from Middle English snowte, from Middle Dutch snute; ultimately from Proto-Germanic *snūtaz. Doublet of snout.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

snoot (plural snoots)

  1. (informal) An elitist individual; one who looks down upon lower social classes.
    • 1943, Lucius Morris Beebe, Snoot if You Must[1], D. Appleton-Century Company, Incorporated, page 44:
      The sidecars— sneer if you will, you purists and gastronomic snoots— at Perino's in Wilshire in Los Angeles.
    • 2013 October 29, Moosewood Collective, Sundays at Moosewood Restaurant: Ethnic and Regional Recipes from the Cooks at the Legendary Restaurant[2], Simon & Schuster, →ISBN, page 96:
      In defense of low-grade teas, I must say they are very cheap, and I have a large box in my cupboard right next to the higher quality, more snoot-worthy varieties.
    • 2014 January 31, Robert B Parker, Perish Twice[3], Oldcastle Books, →ISBN, page 73:
      “Do you know any of Larry's other partners?” “Some.” “Do you know Mary Lou Goddard?” “Oh, that snoot.” “Snoot?” “Yes, Larry told me about her. He went out with her a couple of times and then she got possessive.”
  2. A language pedant or snob; one who practices linguistic elitism. (Can we add an example for this sense?)
  3. (dialectal or slang) A nose or snout, especially in derogatory use.
    • 2013 March 3 [1966], Friedrich Reck, Paul Rubens, transl., Diary of a Man in Despair[4], New York Review of Books, →ISBN, page 173:
      And then he did something which must be unprecedented in jurisprudence. He leaped from his chair, ran over to the old man, and shaking his fist under his nose, roared: 'Listen, you! If you keep on with this stuff, I'll punch you one in the snoot!
  4. (Internet slang, childish, humorous) Snout; especially of a dog ("doggo") or snake ("snek").
  5. (theater, photography) A cylindrical or conical attachment used on a spotlight to restrict spill light.
    • 2014 December 26, Alyn Stafford, Flash Techniques for Location Portraiture: Single and Multiple-Flash Lighting Techniques[5], Amherst Media, →ISBN, page 36:
      Snoots have traditionally been round in shape when attached to studio strobes, but with flash photography, they have taken on a more rectangular shape because the flash heads are rectangular.

VerbEdit

snoot (third-person singular simple present snoots, present participle snooting, simple past and past participle snooted)

  1. To behave disdainfully toward.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

snoot

  1. singular past indicative of snuiten

ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English snowte. Cognate with English snout.

NounEdit

snoot (plural snoots)

  1. (anatomy) snout, face, head
  2. (geography) a projecting point of land
  3. peak of a cap
  4. (slang) detective, policeman

Derived termsEdit