See also: no sé, носе, ноше, and nóšě

EnglishEdit

 
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Nose: the sensory organ

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English nose, from Old English nosu, from Proto-West Germanic *nosu, variant of *nasō, old dual from Proto-Indo-European *néh₂s- ~ *nh₂es- (nose, nostril)

See also Saterland Frisian Noose, West Frisian noas, Dutch neus, Swedish nos, Norwegian nos (snout), German Low German Nees, Nes, Näs, German Nase, Swedish näsa, Norwegian nese (nose); also Latin nāris (nostril), nāsus (nose), Lithuanian nósis, Russian нос (nos), Sanskrit नासा (nā́sā, nostrils).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nose (plural noses)

  1. A protuberance on the face housing the nostrils, which are used to breathe or smell.
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 17, in The China Governess[1]:
      The face which emerged was not reassuring. It was blunt and grey, the nose springing thick and flat from high on the frontal bone of the forehead, whilst his eyes were narrow slits of dark in a tight bandage of tissue.  [] .
    She has a cold in the nose.
  2. A snout, the nose of an animal.
  3. The tip of an object.
    the nose of a tea-kettle, a bellows, or a fighter plane
  4. The bulge on the side of a piece of a jigsaw puzzle, that fits into the hole of its adjacent piece.
  5. (horse racing) The length of a horse’s nose, used to indicate the distance between horses at the finish of a race, or any very close race.
    Red Rum only won by a nose.
  6. A perfumer.
  7. The power of smelling.
    • c. 1700 Jeremy Collier, Of Envy
      We are not offended with [] a dog for a better nose than his master.
  8. Bouquet, the smell of something, especially wine.
  9. The skill in recognising bouquet.
    It is essential that a winetaster develops a good nose.
  10. (by extension) Skill at finding information.
    A successful reporter has a nose for news.
  11. (architecture) A downward projection from a cornice.
    Synonym: drip
  12. (slang) An informer.
    Synonym: nark
    • 1846, George William MacArthur Reynolds, The Mysteries of London (page 60)
      [] M was a Magsman, frequenting Pall-Mall; / N was a Nose that turned chirp on his pal; []

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Sranan Tongo: noso

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

nose (third-person singular simple present noses, present participle nosing, simple past and past participle nosed)

  1. (intransitive) To move cautiously by advancing its front end.
    The ship nosed through the minefield.
  2. (intransitive) To snoop.
    She was nosing around other people’s business.
  3. (transitive) To detect by smell or as if by smell.
    • c. 1599–1602 (date written), William Shakespeare, “The Tragedie of Hamlet, Prince of Denmarke”, in Mr. William Shakespeares Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies [] (First Folio), London: [] Isaac Iaggard, and Ed[ward] Blount, published 1623, →OCLC, [Act IV, scene iii], page 273:
      [] if you finde him not this moneth, you ſhall noſe him as you go vp the ſtaires into the Lobby.
    • 1938, Norman Lindsay, Age of Consent, 1st Australian edition, Sydney, N.S.W.: Ure Smith, published 1962, →OCLC, page 18:
      Dogs hurried out to nose Edmund[.]
    • 2002 October 20, Bob Morris, “Connoisseurship Runneth Over”, in The New York Times[2], →ISSN:
      Real connoisseurs know that to nose and taste properly you have to add still water to your tulip-shaped glass so that the alcohol doesn't overwhelm you.
  4. (transitive) To push with one's nose; to nuzzle.
    • 1868, Alfred Tennyson, “Lucretius”, in The Holy Grail and Other Poems, London: Strahan and Co., [], published 1870, →OCLC, page 211:
      [L]ambs are glad / Nosing the mother's udder, and the bird / Makes his heart voice among the blaze of flowers: []
  5. (transitive) To defeat (as in a race or other contest) by a narrow margin; sometimes with out.
  6. (transitive) To utter in a nasal manner; to pronounce with a nasal twang.
    to nose a prayer
    • c. 1635, William Cartwright, The Ordinary:
      It makes far better musick when you nose Sternold's, or Wisdom's meeter.
  7. (transitive) To furnish with a nose.
    to nose a stair tread
  8. (transitive) To confront; be closely face to face or opposite to.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

AnagramsEdit

CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nose

  1. vocative/locative singular of nos

VerbEdit

nose

  1. masculine singular present transgressive of nosit

Related termsEdit

JapaneseEdit

RomanizationEdit

nose

  1. Rōmaji transcription of のせ

Lower SorbianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈnɔsɛ/, [ˈnɔsə]

NounEdit

nose

  1. nominative/accusative plural of nos

Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English nosu, from Proto-West Germanic *nosu.

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nose (plural noses or nosen)

  1. nose (protrusion of the human face)
    • a. 1394, Geoffrey Chaucer, “General Prologue”, in The Canterbury Tales[3], lines 151-152:
      Ful semyly hir wympul pynched was / Hir nose tretys, hir eyen greye as glas []
      Her wimple was folded in quite a seemly way / Her nose [was] slender; her eyes [were] grey like glass []
  2. beak, nose-shaped protrusion
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Probably from Old French nous, nos, nominative singular of nou, no (knot).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nose (plural noses)

  1. (rare, Late Middle English) noose
DescendantsEdit
ReferencesEdit

Northern SothoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Bantu *njíkɪ̀.

NounEdit

nose

  1. bee

Norwegian NynorskEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • nosa (a- and split infinitives)

VerbEdit

nose (present tense nosar, past tense nosa, past participle nosa, passive infinitive nosast, present participle nosande, imperative nose/nos)

  1. (transitive) to sniff, nose

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit

Old EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

nose

  1. inflection of nosu:
    1. accusative/genitive/dative singular
    2. nominative/accusative plural

Old FrisianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

nose f

  1. nose

InflectionEdit

DescendantsEdit

Serbo-CroatianEdit

VerbEdit

nose (Cyrillic spelling носе)

  1. third-person plural present of nositi

SlovakEdit

NounEdit

nose

  1. locative singular of nos