See also: poké and Poké-

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Middle English, perhaps from Middle Dutch poken or Middle Low German poken (both from Proto-Germanic *puk-), which is probably imitative.

VerbEdit

poke (third-person singular simple present pokes, present participle poking, simple past and past participle poked)

  1. To prod or jab with an object such as a finger or a stick. [from later 14th c.]
    • 2010 December 29, Sam Sheringham, “Liverpool 0 - 1 Wolverhampton”, in BBC[1]:
      Ward showed good pace to beat the advancing Reina to the ball and poke a low finish into the corner.
  2. To stir up a fire to remove ash or promote burning.
  3. (figuratively) To rummage; to feel or grope around. [from early 19th c.]
    Synonyms: fumble, glaum, root; see also Thesaurus:feel around
    I poked about in the rubble, trying to find my lost keys.
  4. (transitive, computing, dated) To modify the value stored in (a memory address).
    Coordinate term: peek
    • 1984 July 1, Franco Frey, “SPECGRAFFITI”, in Crash, number 6:
      The 200 UDGs may be used either by paging between 10 sets of 20 UDGs or, alternatively, by displaying 96 different characters by poking the system variable CHARS with 256 less than the starting address of your graphics.
    • 1985, Tom Weishaar, Bert Kersey, The DOStalk Scrapbook, page 44:
      If you try to poke a value outside this range into a byte, Basic will beep you with an ILLEGAL QUANTITY error.
  5. (transitive) To put a poke (device to prevent leaping or breaking fences) on (an animal).
    to poke an ox
  6. (transitive) To thrust at with the horns; to gore.
  7. (transitive, informal, social media) To notify (another user) of activity on social media or an instant messenger.
    • 2009, Alexander Tokar, Metaphors of the Web 2.0, Peter Lang, →ISBN, page 68:
      Indeed, when we poke users who normally do not have access to our profiles, they will be able to temporarily see our Basic Info, Work Info, and Education Info.
  8. (transitive) To thrust (something) in a particular direction such as the tongue.
  9. (transitive, slang, vulgar) To penetrate in sexual intercourse.
    Synonyms: drill, nail, pound; see also Thesaurus:copulate with
    • 1996 November 25, Washington Times quoted in The Dictionary of Modern Proverbs[2]:
      Maj. Cloutier commented to Lt. Clemm, "You know what they say about a girl who smokes: If she smokes, she pokes."
    • 2000, Katherine Jones, Jerry's Nightmare, page 115:
      He chewed her nipples and clitoris until they bled, and poked her until she could hardly walk. Grandpa never got enough sex []
    • 2001, Y tu mamá también [And Your Mother Too], spoken by Julio Zapata:
      No big deal. I poked Ana a bunch of times.
Derived termsEdit
Terms derived from poke (verb)
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

poke (plural pokes)

  1. A prod, jab, or thrust.
  2. (US, slang) A lazy person; a dawdler.
  3. (US, slang) A stupid or uninteresting person.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bartlett to this entry?)
  4. (US) A device to prevent an animal from leaping or breaking through fences, consisting of a yoke with a pole inserted, pointed forward.
  5. (computing, dated) The storage of a value in a memory address, typically to modify the behaviour of a program or to cheat at a video game.
    • 1984, Electronics & Wireless World, volume 90, page 6:
      [] everywhere you see listings festooned with Goto statements and peppered with peeks and pokes.
    • 1984, Northcon/84, Mini/Micro Northwest-84 Conference Record:
      One of the major limitations is that the Commodore 64 does not easily support auto-repeat (it must be turned on by a poke instruction from BASIC).
    • 1988 July 1, Lloyd Mangram, “Forum”, in Crash, number 54:
      Perhaps all those super hackers who so regularly produce infinite lives etc. could produce pokes to be used by 128K users.
  6. (informal, social media) A notification sent to get another user's attention on social media or an instant messenger.
    • 2007 July 22, David Smith, “Faceoff!”, in The Guardian[3]:
      It could be described as a poke, but not a friendly one. For those who have not yet succumbed to Facebook, the latest craze on the internet, a ‘poke’ is an electronic greeting sent, for example, to an old friend from university.
  7. A poke bonnet.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English poke, from Anglo-Norman poke (whence pocket), from Frankish *poka. More at pocket.

NounEdit

poke (plural pokes)

  1. (now regional) A sack or bag. [from early 13th c.]
    • c. 1599, William Shakespeare, As You Like It, act 2, scene 7:
      And then he drew a dial from his poke,
      And, looking on it with lack-lustre eye,
      Says very wisely, ‘It is ten o'clock…’
    • 1605, William Camden, Remaines Concerning Brittaine, 1629 edition, Proverbes, page 276:
      When the Pig is proffered, hold vp the poke.
    • 1627, Michael Drayton, Minor Poems of Michael Drayton, 1907 edition, poem Nimphidia:
      And suddainly vntyes the Poke,
      Which out of it sent such a smoke,
      As ready was them all to choke,
      So greeuous was the pother []
    • 1814, September 4, The Examiner, volume 13, number 349, article French Fashions, page 573:
      … and as to shape, a nightmare has as much. Under the poke and the muff-box, the face sometimes entirely disappears …
    • 1946, Mezz Mezzrow and Bernard Wolfe, Really the Blues, Payback Press 1999, page 91:
      In the summertime they'd reach out and snatch your straw hat right off your head, and if you were fool enough to go after it your poke was bound to be lighter when you came out.
    • 2008, James Kelman, Kieron Smith, Boy, Penguin 2009, page 138:
      She did not eat blood-oranges. Her maw gived her one in a poke and she was going to throw it in the bin, Oh it is all black.
  2. A long, wide sleeve.
    Synonym: poke sleeve
  3. (Scotland, Northern Ireland) An ice cream cone.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

Either a shortening of, or from the same source as, pocan (pokeweed) (q.v.).

NounEdit

poke (uncountable)

  1. (dialectal) Pokeweed.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Etymology 4Edit

Borrowed from Hawaiian poke (literally to cut crosswise into pieces).

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

poke (uncountable)

  1. (Hawaii) Slices or cubes of raw fish or other raw seafood, mixed with sesame oil, seaweed, sea salt, herbs, spices, or other flavorful ingredients.
    • 2004 October 17, Garrett Hongo, “Poke”, in The New York Times[4], ISSN 0362-4331:
      Though I'd often eaten sashimi, poke was then completely new to me—delicious rubies of cubed fish dressed in light sesame oil, garnished with minced bits of reddish-brown seaweed and the ground centers of kukui nuts (see recipe, next page).
    • 2016 February 4, Ligaya Mishan, “Poke Reaches the Shores of Manhattan”, in The New York Times[5], ISSN 0362-4331:
      The fishmonger offered the poke in plastic tubs, without ceremony, just as I had always known it in Honolulu, where I grew up and where some of the best poke is sold at a liquor store, Tamura’s. Then, a few years back, poke started appearing on stray restaurant menus, sometimes identified as Hawaiian crudo or ceviche.

Alternative formsEdit

Usage notesEdit

Often typeset as poké to aid pronunciation.

Derived termsEdit
See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈpoke/, [ˈpo̞ke̞]
  • Rhymes: -oke
  • Syllabification: po‧ke

Etymology 1Edit

From portsari (doorman).

NounEdit

poke

  1. (slang) doorman, bouncer (at a bar or nightclub)
DeclensionEdit
Inflection of poke (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative poke poket
genitive poken pokejen
partitive pokea pokeja
illative pokeen pokeihin
singular plural
nominative poke poket
accusative nom. poke poket
gen. poken
genitive poken pokejen
pokeinrare
partitive pokea pokeja
inessive pokessa pokeissa
elative pokesta pokeista
illative pokeen pokeihin
adessive pokella pokeilla
ablative pokelta pokeilta
allative pokelle pokeille
essive pokena pokeina
translative pokeksi pokeiksi
instructive pokein
abessive poketta pokeitta
comitative pokeineen
Possessive forms of poke (type nalle)
possessor singular plural
1st person pokeni pokemme
2nd person pokesi pokenne
3rd person pokensa

Etymology 2Edit

From porno (pornography).

NounEdit

poke

  1. (slang) pornography
DeclensionEdit
Inflection of poke (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative poke poket
genitive poken pokejen
partitive pokea pokeja
illative pokeen pokeihin
singular plural
nominative poke poket
accusative nom. poke poket
gen. poken
genitive poken pokejen
pokeinrare
partitive pokea pokeja
inessive pokessa pokeissa
elative pokesta pokeista
illative pokeen pokeihin
adessive pokella pokeilla
ablative pokelta pokeilta
allative pokelle pokeille
essive pokena pokeina
translative pokeksi pokeiksi
instructive pokein
abessive poketta pokeitta
comitative pokeineen
Possessive forms of poke (type nalle)
possessor singular plural
1st person pokeni pokemme
2nd person pokesi pokenne
3rd person pokensa

IdoEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

poke

  1. slightly

MaoriEdit

AdjectiveEdit

poke

  1. grimy

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Anglo-Norman poke.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

poke (plural pokes)

  1. sack, pouch, bag

DescendantsEdit

  • English: poke
  • Yola: poake, pooke

ReferencesEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Frankish *poka.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

poke f (oblique plural pokes, nominative singular poke, nominative plural pokes)

  1. sack
    E puis les poudrez bien de sel e les mettez ensemble en une poke de bon kanevaz

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Tocharian AEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Tocharian *pokowjä-, earlier *pākewjä-, from pre-Tocharian *bʰeh₂ǵʰow-h₁en- (definite), ultimately from Proto-Indo-European *bʰeh₂ǵʰús (arm). Compare Tocharian B pokai.

NounEdit

poke

  1. arm

ReferencesEdit

  • Adams, Douglas Q. (2013), “poko*”, in A Dictionary of Tocharian B: Revised and Greatly Enlarged (Leiden Studies in Indo-European; 10), Amsterdam, New York: Rodopi, →ISBN, page 434