strages

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Indo-European *sterh₃-, the root of sternō (I spread, bestrew, scatter, fell), with a *-g- extension. Cognate with Ancient Greek στόρνυμι (stórnumi, scatter), στρατός (stratós, army, people, body of men), Old English strewian (English strew).

NounEdit

strāgēs f (genitive strāgis); third declension

  1. overthrow
  2. confusion
  3. defeat, slaughter, massacre, butchery, carnage

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative strāgēs strāgēs
Genitive strāgis strāgium
Dative strāgī strāgibus
Accusative strāgem strāgēs
strāgīs
Ablative strāge strāgibus
Vocative strāgēs strāgēs

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Italian: strage
  • Piedmontese: strage
  • Portuguese: estrago
  • Spanish: estrago

ReferencesEdit

  • strages”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • strages”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • strages in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to massacre: stragem edere, facere