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See also: SWATH

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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English swath, swathe, from Old English swæþ, swaþu (track; trace; footstep; mark; vestige; scar), from Proto-Germanic *swaþō (a wind-swept place; open field; borderland; terrain). Cognate with Dutch zwade, zwad (swath; windrow), German Schwade (swath; windrow), Icelandic svæði (area; zone; sector; region).

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /swɒθ/
  • (US) IPA(key): /swɑθ/, /swɔθ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒθ

NounEdit

swath (plural swaths)

  1. The track cut out by a scythe in mowing.
  2. (often figuratively) A broad sweep or expanse, such as of land or of people.
    A large swath of the population is opposed to this government policy.
    Five days after Hurricane Katrina, large swaths of New Orleans are still submerged in water.
    • 2015 February 20, Jesse Jackson, “In the Ferguson era, Malcolm X’s courage in fighting racism inspires more than ever”, in The Guardian (London)[1]:
      It is undeniable that Malcolm was a beacon of huge strength in his lifetime. He could connect with swaths of people when others could not.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English swaþu.

NounEdit

swath

  1. Alternative form of swathe (swath)

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English *swaþian.

VerbEdit

swath

  1. Alternative form of swathen