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See also: slóg, sløg, and слог

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably a variation of slug or slough.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɒɡ

NounEdit

slog (plural slogs)

  1. (chiefly Britain and Canada) A long, tedious walk, or session of work.
    • 2019 November 14, Phil McNulty, “England 0-0 Brazil”, in BBC News[1]:
      England's experimental line-up will have realised early on that this would be a long, hard slog against the multi-talented Brazilians with great strength in their starting line-up and on the bench.
  2. (cricket) An aggressive shot played with little skill.

VerbEdit

slog (third-person singular simple present slogs, present participle slogging, simple past and past participle slogged)

  1. To walk slowly, encountering resistance.
    • 2014, Paul Salopek, Blessed. Cursed. Claimed., National Geographic (December 2014)[2]
      A miraculous desert rain. We slog, dripping, into As Safi, Jordan. We drive the sodden mules through wet streets. To the town’s only landmark. To the “Museum at the Lowest Place on Earth.”
  2. (by extension) To work slowly and deliberately at a tedious task.
  3. To strike something with a heavy blow, especially a ball with a bat.

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

VerbEdit

slog

  1. past tense of slå

Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

NounEdit

slȍg m (Cyrillic spelling сло̏г)

  1. syllable
  2. stack, pile

DeclensionEdit


SwedishEdit

VerbEdit

slog

  1. past tense of slå.