See also: Striga, strigã, strigă, and štriga

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin striga (a furrow)

NounEdit

striga (plural strigae)

  1. (botany) A sharp bristle or hair-like scale.
  2. A stripe or stria.
  3. (architecture) The flute of a column.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

striga

  1. inflection of strigare:
    1. third-person singular present indicative
    2. second-person singular imperative

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Ancient Greek στρίξ (stríx, screecher), which also gave strī̆x (screech owl; witch).

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈstriː.ɡa/, [ˈs̠t̪riːɡä] or IPA(key): /ˈstri.ɡa/, [ˈs̠t̪rɪɡä]
  • (Ecclesiastical) IPA(key): /ˈstri.ɡa/, [ˈst̪riːɡä]
  • Note: on Romance evidence, the length of the vowel varied.

NounEdit

strī̆ga f (genitive strī̆gae); first declension

  1. A female evil spirit, nocturnal apparition; a nightmare.
    Synonyms: incubus, ephialtēs
    1. A vampire.
      Synonym: vampȳrus
    2. A witch, hag.
      Synonyms: volātica, malefica, venēfica, strī̆x
DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative strī̆ga strī̆gae
Genitive strī̆gae strī̆gārum
Dative strī̆gae strī̆gīs
Accusative strī̆gam strī̆gās
Ablative strī̆gā strī̆gīs
Vocative strī̆ga strī̆gae
DescendantsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Proto-Italic *strigā, from what looks like a cross of Proto-Indo-European *streyg- (to brush, strip, shear) and Proto-Indo-European *strengʰ- (to draw, tie).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

striga f (genitive strigae); first declension

  1. A strip, row, line.
    1. (agriculture) A windrow.
  2. (surveying) A strip of ground longer than broad.
    Antonym: scamnum
    1. (military) A side-avenue in camp.
DeclensionEdit

First-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative striga strigae
Genitive strigae strigārum
Dative strigae strigīs
Accusative strigam strigās
Ablative strigā strigīs
Vocative striga strigae
Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • striga” on page 2015 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (2nd ed., 2012)
  • De Vaan, Michiel (2008), “stringō”, in Etymological Dictionary of Latin and the other Italic Languages (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 7), Leiden, Boston: Brill, →ISBN, page 591
  • Meyer-Lübke, Wilhelm (1911), “striga”, in Romanisches etymologisches Wörterbuch (in German)

Further readingEdit

  • striga in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • striga in Charles du Fresne du Cange’s Glossarium Mediæ et Infimæ Latinitatis (augmented edition with additions by D. P. Carpenterius, Adelungius and others, edited by Léopold Favre, 1883–1887)
  • striga in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • striga in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • striga in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

RomagnolEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin strĭgam (witch), accusative of Latin strĭga (witch).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

striga f (plural strig)

  1. witch
    • La pêr una striga!
      She looks like a witch!

ReferencesEdit

Adelmo Masotti (1999) Vocabolario romagnolo italiano (in Italian), Zanichelli, page 630


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Vulgar Latin root *strigāre from Latin strix (screech owl).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

a striga (third-person singular present strigă, past participle strigat1st conj.

  1. to call
  2. to shout, yell, scream

ConjugationEdit

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Romanian strigă, from Latin strīga.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈstri.ɡa/
  • Hyphenation: stri‧ga

NounEdit

striga f (genitive singular strigy, nominative plural strigy, genitive plural stríg, declension pattern of žena)

  1. witch
  2. demon

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • striga in Slovak dictionaries at slovnik.juls.savba.sk

VenetianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin striga (evil spirit, compare Friulian strie, Italian strega, Ligurian stria, Lombard stria, and also Romanian strigă), from strīx, from Ancient Greek στρίγξ (strínx).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

striga f (plural strighe)

  1. witch, sorceress (female who uses magic)

Related termsEdit