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See also: Kus, kuś, kūs, Kūs, kuş, kú·s, and Kuś

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AfrikaansEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Dutch kust, from Middle Dutch cost, from Old French coste, from Latin costa (rib, side)

NounEdit

kus (plural kuste)

  1. coast, shoreline, seashore
    • 1986, Die Noordweste. Die stoflike kultuuruitinge van die streek se bewoners, page 31.
      In 1862 word 'n pad vanaf die kopermyne na Hondeklipbaai aan die kus gebou.
      In 1862 a path from the copper mines to Hondeklip Bay at the coast is built.
  2. coastal region
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Dutch kus, kussen, from Middle Dutch kos, cussen, from Old Dutch *kos, kussen, from Proto-Germanic *kussaz, *kussijaną. Germanic term, cognate with English kiss, German küssen, etc.

NounEdit

kus (plural kusse)

  1. kiss
    • 1984, Eugène Nielen Marais, Versamelde werke, Leon Rousseau (ed.), Van Schaik (publ.), page 930.
      Sy vou haar armpies om die ou man se nek maar in plaas van haar geheimpie te hoor, bedek hy die gesiggie met kusse.
      She wraps her short arms around the old man's neck, but instead of listening to her secret he covers her little face with kisses.

VerbEdit

kus (present kus, present participle kussende, past participle gekus)

  1. to kiss
    • 2012, Pieter Aspe, Vierkant van die wraak, LAPA.
      Sy steek 'n hand na hom uit, en vir 'n oomblik oorweeg hy om dit galant te kus.
      She holds a hand in front of him, and for a moment he considers kissing it gallantly.
SynonymsEdit

Usage notesEdit

The use of kus as an alternative for soen is rarely used in speech but is more commonly found in literature, often being used poetically.


CatawbaEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the same root as kusa (standing), because the stalks stand upright.

NounEdit

kus

  1. corn, maize

Usage notesEdit

The initial consonant is sometimes voiced: gus.

Derived termsEdit

  • kus suk (corncob, literally corn house)
  • kus sarak (wheat, literally corn grass)

ReferencesEdit

  • 1900, Albert S. Gatschet, Grammatic Sketch of the Catawba Language (published in the American Anthropologist)

CzechEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *kǫsъ.

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

NounEdit

kus m

  1. piece (part)
  2. chunk

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit

  • kus in Příruční slovník jazyka českého, 1935–1957
  • kus in Slovník spisovného jazyka českého, 1960–1971, 1989

DutchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle Dutch kos, kus, from Old Dutch *kos, *kus, from Proto-Germanic *kussaz. The older Dutch forms with -u- are taken from the verb, those with -o- derive directly from the noun. Compare German Kuss, English kiss, Danish kys.

NounEdit

kus m (plural kussen, diminutive kusje n)

  1. Kiss
SynonymsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

VerbEdit

kus

  1. first-person singular present indicative of kussen
  2. imperative of kussen

EstonianEdit

AdverbEdit

kus

  1. (interrogative) where (in which place)
  2. (relative) where (in which place)

FrenchEdit

NounEdit

kus m

  1. plural of ku

KarelianEdit

PronounEdit

kus

  1. where

LivonianEdit

PronounEdit

kus

  1. where

Old High GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *kussaz, whence also Old Saxon kus, Old English coss, Old Norse koss.

NounEdit

kus m

  1. kiss

DescendantsEdit


Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *kussaz. Compare Old English coss, Old Frisian koss, Old High German kus, Old Norse koss.

NounEdit

kus m

  1. a kiss

DeclensionEdit


Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit


Serbo-CroatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *kǫsъ.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kȗs m (Cyrillic spelling ку̑с)

  1. (rare) piece, part

DeclensionEdit

SynonymsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

kȗs (definite kȗsī, Cyrillic spelling ку̑с) (rare)

  1. tailless
  2. too short
  3. incomplete

DeclensionEdit


SlovakEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Slavic *kǫsъ, cognate with Russian кус (kus) and кусок (kusok), Slovene kos, Serbo-Croatian кус, kus, Bulgarian къс (kǎs). Non-Slavic cognates include Sanskrit खादति (khādati, he chews), Persian خاییدن(xāyīdan, to chew).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kus m (genitive singular kusa, nominative plural kusy, genitive plural kusov, declension pattern of dub)

  1. piece

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • kus in Slovak dictionaries at korpus.sk

Tocharian AEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Tocharian *kuse, from Proto-Indo-European *kʷusó from *kʷos, *kʷis. Compare Tocharian B kᵤse.

PronounEdit

kus (accusative kuc)

  1. (interrogative pronoun) who

Related termsEdit


TurkishEdit

VepsEdit

EtymologyEdit

  This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions. You can also discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.

AdverbEdit

kus

  1. where, in what place (interrogative)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Zajceva, N. G.; Mullonen, M. I. (2007), “где”, in Uz’ venä-vepsläine vajehnik / Novyj russko-vepsskij slovarʹ [New Russian–Veps Dictionary], Petrozavodsk: Periodika

WestrobothnianEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

kus m

  1. One who puts fear in someone; master, foreman, supervisor.
    Hä står ill dill ti huse, der ingen jär kus
    There is trouble in the house where no one is master
  2. A strong, capable man, considered better than others; the most prominent; also said of animals.
    Hä va kusen dill kar!
    A good man!
    Hä var kus’n dill häst
    a good horse
  3. crawling winged insect

HomophonesEdit