traditor

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin traditor (betrayer), from trado (I hand over). See traitor.

NounEdit

traditor (plural traditors or traditores)

  1. A deliverer; a name of infamy given to Christians who delivered the Scriptures, or the goods of the church, to their persecutors to save their lives.
    • 1794, Joseph Milner, The History of the Church of Christ
      A number of bishops cooperated with him , piqued that they had not been called to the ordination of Cæcilian . Seventy bishops , a number of whom had been traditors , met thus together at Carthage , to depose Cæcilian.

ReferencesEdit


ItalianEdit

NounEdit

traditor m (invariable)

  1. Apocopic form of traditore

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From trādō (give up, hand over); literally "one who hands over (something)".

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trāditor m (genitive trāditōris, feminine trāditrīx); third declension

  1. betrayer, traitor
  2. teacher

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative trāditor trāditōrēs
Genitive trāditōris trāditōrum
Dative trāditōrī trāditōribus
Accusative trāditōrem trāditōrēs
Ablative trāditōre trāditōribus
Vocative trāditor trāditōrēs

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


PiedmonteseEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

traditor m (plural traditor)

  1. traitor