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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin magister (a master, chief, head, superior, director, teacher, etc.), from magis (more or great) + -ter. Doublet of master and maestro.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈmædʒɪstə(ɹ)/

NounEdit

magister (plural magisters)

 
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English Wikipedia has an article on:
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  1. Master; sir: a title used in the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority, or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts.
  2. The possessor of a master's degree.

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TranslationsEdit

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AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From magis (more or great) + Proto-Indo-European *-teros. Compare minister.

PronunciationEdit

  • (Classical) IPA(key): /maˈɡis.ter/, [maˈɡɪs.t̪ɛr]
  • (file)

NounEdit

magister m (genitive magistrī); second declension

  1. teacher
  2. master; a title of the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts

DeclensionEdit

Second-declension noun (nominative singular in -er).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative magister magistrī
Genitive magistrī magistrōrum
Dative magistrō magistrīs
Accusative magistrum magistrōs
Ablative magistrō magistrīs
Vocative magister magistrī

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

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DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin magister.

NounEdit

magister m (definite singular magisteren, indefinite plural magistere or magistre or magistrer, definite plural magisterne or magistrene)

  1. The possessor of the academic degree of magister, a historical equivalent of the doctorate (1479–1845 and 1921–2003)

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin magister.

NounEdit

magister m (definite singular magisteren, indefinite plural magistrar, definite plural magistrane)

  1. The possessor of the academic degree of magister, a historical equivalent of the doctorate (1479–1845 and 1921–2003)

ReferencesEdit


PolishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Directly from Latin magister.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

magister m pers (abbreviation mgr)

  1. magister (The possessor of a master's degree)
  2. master's degree (a postgraduate degree)

DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

magister f (abbreviation mgr)

  1. female equivalent of magister (The possessor of a master's degree)

DeclensionEdit

Indeclinable.

Related termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin magister.

NounEdit

magister m (plural magisters)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) male teacher

SynonymsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) scolast
  • (Sutsilvan) surmester

Coordinate termsEdit