See also: Magister and magíster

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin magister ‎(a master, chief, head, superior, director, teacher, etc.), from magis ‎(more or great) + -ter.

PronunciationEdit

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NounEdit

magister ‎(plural magisters)

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  1. Master; sir: a title used in the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority, or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts.
  2. The possessor of a master's degree.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

External linksEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From magis ‎(more or great) + *-tero-. Compare minister.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

magister m ‎(genitive magistrī); second declension

  1. teacher
  2. master; a title of the Middle Ages, given to a person in authority or to one having a license from a university to teach philosophy and the liberal arts

DeclensionEdit

Second declension, nominative singular in -er.

Case Singular Plural
nominative magister magistrī
genitive magistrī magistrōrum
dative magistrō magistrīs
accusative magistrum magistrōs
ablative magistrō magistrīs
vocative magister1 magistrī

1May also be magistre.

Coordinate termsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • magister in Charlton T. Lewis & Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • magister in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • magister” in Félix Gaffiot (1934), Dictionnaire Illustré Latin-Français, Paris: Hachette.
  • Meissner, Carl; Auden, Henry William (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to receive instruction from some one: disciplina alicuius uti, magistro aliquo uti
    • a teacher of rhetoric: rhetor, dicendi magister
    • a dictator appoints a magister equitum: dictator dicit (legit) magistrum equitum
  • magister in Harry Thurston Peck, editor (1898) Harper's Dictionary of Classical Antiquities, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • magister” in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[2], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • magister in William Smith et al., editor (1890) A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities, London: William Wayte. G. E. Marindin

NorwegianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin magister.

NounEdit

magister

  1. The possessor of the academic degree of magister, a historical equivalent of the doctorate (1479–1845 and 1921–2003)

RomanschEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from Latin magister.

NounEdit

magister m (plural magisters)

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) male teacher

SynonymsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sursilvan, Sutsilvan, Surmiran) scolast
  • (Sutsilvan) surmester

Coordinate termsEdit

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