traductor

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin trāductiō, from trādūcō (lead across, bring across), from trans (across, beyond) + dūcō (bear, carry).

NounEdit

traductor (plural traductors)

  1. (obsolete) translator.
    • 1847, Richard Winter Hamilton, The Revealed Doctrine of Rewards and Punishments, page 369:
      This early use of the words is most decisive of their meaning : when the two languages reflect the same meaning, the evidence overflows. Both are consecrated to one religious idea. Who could be so well qualified as the Alexandrine traductors to construe Mosaic phrase, — not only by a knowledge of the Hebrew language, but by an accurate acquaintance with the manner in which these terms had always been understood?
    • 1910, Alberto B. Martínez, General Census of the Population, Buildings, Trades and Industries of the City of Buenos Aires:
      There are doctors, traductors, advocates, doctors in law, bookkeepers notaries, etc., amongst women.
    • 1934 June, C.S. Brown, “The Friendly Endeavor”, in George Fox University Archives:
      Thus, at the Virgin's side may he seen a piece of stone; beside a crucifix a cutting of wood." (And, in a case witnessed by the traductor, human skulls beside the altar.)
    • 1968, Tsing Hua journal of Chinese studies, page 33:
      Prof. W. Hung (Tu Fu, p. 38) censures previous traductors for their use of the pronoun of the second person which, in his opinion, makes the poem "sound as if the elder poet were being chided as a worthless boy".
  2. Anything that translates information from one format into a different format.
    • 1980, Journal of Digital Systems, page 44:
      An information traductor carries information from some source (such as an expression) to some destination (such as a register, or module port).
    • 2000, Romanian Journal of Biochemistry - Volumes 37-44, page 11:
      The determinant factors are in connection with: the nature of the molecular biorecognition layer of the biological traductor, the enzymatic activity of the whole system or even of the isolated enzymes (in a well-defined biosensor area or fixed on a polymeric membrane) and the concentration of the L-glutamate substrate.
    • 2018, C Panaitescu, MG Petrescu, “Research About the Corosive Effects of FeCl3 in the Aeration Wastewater Basin”, in IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering, volume 295, number 1:
      Oxygen was continuously measured with dissolved oxygen traductor and through the automation system the quantity is adjusted by the air introduced into the aeration tank and the period of denitrification.
  3. (railroad) A long arm that is used to suspend a bag to be dropped onto a passing train and which retracts automatically be means of a spring when the bag is dropped.
    • 1896, Lawrence Saunders, S. R. Blundstone, The Railway Engineer - Volume 17, page 325:
      As soon as the bag is removed, the lever returns to its normal position by the action of the spring in the column, the traductor striking the rubber disc already referred to.
    • 1961, Oswald Stevens Nock, British steam railways, page 56:
      Nearing Coatbridge, with five pouches to be set down, all four traductors on the stowage van were loaded ready, and there was yet another on the sorting carriage next in rear.
    • 2002, Ian Harrison, Pat Hammond, Hornby: The Official Illustrated History, page 72:
      The ground apparatus consists of one or more standards from which the bags to be picked up by the train are hung, and a net to collect the bags from the traductors.

AsturianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  This entry needs pronunciation information. If you are familiar with the IPA then please add some!

NounEdit

traductor m (plural traductores)

  1. translator (someone who translates)

CatalanEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

traductor m (plural traductors, feminine traductora)

  1. translator

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From trādūcō (to lead, convey or transfer across or over), in turn from trans (across, over) + dūcere (to lead, to convey).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

trāductor m (genitive trāductōris); third declension

  1. One who transfers or carries over, conveyer.

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative trāductor trāductōrēs
Genitive trāductōris trāductōrum
Dative trāductōrī trāductōribus
Accusative trāductōrem trāductōrēs
Ablative trāductōre trāductōribus
Vocative trāductor trāductōrēs

ReferencesEdit

  • traductor in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • traductor in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • traductor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • traductor in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 16 July 2016) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French traducteur.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

traductor n (plural traductoare)

  1. transmitter
  2. transductor

DeclensionEdit

ParonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin trāductor, with the sense from trādūcō’s post-classical sense 'I translate' (retained in Spanish traducir and other Romance cognates), which displaced the original Latin terms, such as reddō and trānsferō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /tɾadukˈtoɾ/, [t̪ɾa.ð̞ukˈt̪oɾ]
  • Hyphenation: tra‧duc‧tor

AdjectiveEdit

traductor (feminine traductora, masculine plural traductores, feminine plural traductoras)

  1. translating, translator

NounEdit

traductor m (plural traductores, feminine traductora, feminine plural traductoras)

  1. translator (a person who translates something)
  2. (proscribed) translator (a language interpreter)

NounEdit

traductor m (plural traductores)

  1. translator (a computer program that translates)

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit