See also: transwoman and trans-woman

English

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Noun

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trans woman (plural trans women)

  1. A transgender or transsexual woman; i.e., a woman who was assigned male at birth; i.e., a person who was assigned male at birth but who has a female or primarily-female gender identity.
    • 1999, Jody Norton, “The Boy Who Grew Up to Be a Woman”, in Matthew Rottnek, editor, Sissies and Tomboys: Gender Nonconformity and Homosexual Childhood[1], New York University Press, →ISBN, →LCCN, →OCLC, pages 263, 268:
      In “Femininity," Freud describes the limits of psychoanalytic knowledge of the female as follows: “psychoanalysis does not try to describe what a woman is — that would be a task it could scarcely perform — but sets about enquiring how she comes into being.” I was born “male" (whatever the contingencies of that term may be), and I lived my childhood largely (at least visibly) as a boy. But I grew up to be a trans woman. []
      At one point, she spoke of "boys who played the flute in school bands," and I suddenly realized that to have been a boy who played the flute in school bands was a mark of distinction: that to have been that kind of boy included me in a very special and wonderful "sisterhood." I will never again give in to shame about being a flute-playing sissy. I'm proud of the sissy I was, and the trans woman that sissy became. (And I will try, as well, not to be ashamed of the adolescent with hir collar turned up trying so hard to be tough. S/he was struggling hard to survive, and s/he used whatever tools s/he could find.)

Usage notes

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  • Trans woman is often spelled with a space, with trans as an adjective modifying the noun woman, similar to Asian woman, tall woman, fat woman, etc.[1][2][3][4] The unspaced spelling transwoman is sometimes used interchangeably,[2] including by a few transgender people.[5] However, it is often associated with views (notably gender-critical feminism) that hold that transgender women are not women,[1][3][4] and thus require a separate word from woman to describe them. For this reason many transgender people find transwoman offensive.[3][4]

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See also

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References

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  1. 1.0 1.1 Julie Nicholson, Julia Hennock, Jonathan Julian, Supporting Gender Diversity in Early Childhood Classrooms (2019), page 40
  2. 2.0 2.1 Lee Harrington, Traversing Gender: Understanding Transgender Realities (2016), page 52
  3. 3.0 3.1 3.2 German Lopez, "Why you should always use 'transgender' instead of 'transgendered'", Vox, February 18, 2015
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Julia Serano, Whipping Girl (2016), pages 29-30
  5. ^ Cristan Williams, "Transwomans vs Trans Woman", July 17, 2013

Further reading

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