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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Spanish vato, ultimately from chivato. Term is mostly used by people from northwest Mexico (Sinaloa, Sonora, Chihuahua, Baja California).

NounEdit

vato (plural vatos)

  1. (Chicano, slang) Hispanic youth; guy; dude

EsperantoEdit

 
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PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈvato/
  • Hyphenation: va‧to
  • Rhymes: -ato

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from French ouate, German Watte and English wad.

NounEdit

vato (accusative singular vaton, plural vatoj, accusative plural vatojn)

  1. cotton wool

Etymology 2Edit

Borrowed from English watt, etc.

NounEdit

vato (accusative singular vaton, plural vatoj, accusative plural vatojn)

  1. watt
    Synonyms: ŭato, vatto
Derived termsEdit

MalagasyEdit

SpanishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

According to the Chicano poet Luis Alberto Urrea, the word originated in Pachuco slang of the 1940s, and is derived from "the once-common friendly insult chivato or goat.[1]

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈbato/, [ˈbat̪o]

NounEdit

vato m (plural vatos, feminine vata, feminine plural vatas)

  1. (Chicano, slang) Hispanic youth; guy; dude; boyfriend; significant other
    (please add the primary text of this usage example)The vato Harry Gonzalez is an idiot!

Usage notesEdit

This term may be used with intimate friends or as a derogatory reference. In some contexts, the term has gang connotations. The feminine form, vata, is also used by Chicano prostitutes to refer to a female who owes them money.

Derived termsEdit

  • vato loco (gangster, gangbanger, literally crazy dude)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Urrea, Luis Alberto; José Galvez, photographer (2000) Vatos, El Paso: Cinco Puntos Press, →ISBN